Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Oxford stone revisited: causes and consequences of diversity in building limestone used in the historic centre of Oxford, England

By
Miguel Gomez-Heras
Miguel Gomez-Heras
School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology, Queen's University Belfast BT7 1NN, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Bernard J. Smith
Bernard J. Smith
School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology, Queen's University Belfast BT7 1NN, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Heather A. Viles
Heather A. Viles
Oxford University Centre for the Environment, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QY, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2010

Abstract

Stone decay is the result of the interaction of stone with its environment. It is therefore important to understand why certain materials, sometimes not the most suitable, were used to shape the built heritage of specific areas. The historical evolution of these areas conditioned many of the combinations of materials we see today, which in some cases can interact to accelerate decay. These combinations were driven by availability during construction, architectural fashion or the simultaneous utilization of materials that are aesthetically similar but differ significantly in their physical and chemical properties. A microcosm of the complex decisions that determine stone selection and subsequent interactions is provided by the City of Oxford, which is an excellent example of how such historic evolution can work with material characteristics to accelerate decay.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Natural Stone Resources for Historical Monuments

R Přikryl
R Přikryl
Search for other works by this author on:
Á Török
Á Török
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
333
ISBN electronic:
9781862395817
Publication date:
January 01, 2010

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal