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Book Chapter

Andean flat-slab subduction through time

By
Victor A. Ramos
Victor A. Ramos
Laboratorio de Tectónica Andina
,
Universidad de Buenos Aires – CONICET
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Andrés Folguera
Andrés Folguera
Laboratorio de Tectónica Andina
,
Universidad de Buenos Aires – CONICET
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Published:
January 01, 2009

Abstract

The analysis of magmatic distribution, basin formation, tectonic evolution and structural styles of different segments of the Andes shows that most of the Andes have experienced a stage of flat subduction. Evidence is presented here for a wide range of regions throughout the Andes, including the three present flat-slab segments (Pampean, Peruvian, Bucaramanga), three incipient flat-slab segments (‘Carnegie’, Guañacos, ‘Tehuantepec’), three older and no longer active Cenozoic flat-slab segments (Altiplano, Puna, Payenia), and an inferred Palaeozoic flat-slab segment (Early Permian ‘San Rafael’). Based on the present characteristics of the Pampean flat slab, combined with the Peruvian and Bucaramanga segments, a pattern of geological processes can be attributed to slab shallowing and steepening. This pattern permits recognition of other older Cenozoic subhorizontal subduction zones throughout the Andes. Based on crustal thickness, two different settings of slab steepening are proposed. Slab steepening under thick crust leads to delamination, basaltic underplating, lower crustal melting, extension and widespread rhyolitic volcanism, as seen in the caldera formation and huge ignimbritic fields of the Altiplano and Puna segments. On the other hand, when steepening affects thin crust, extension and extensive within-plate basaltic flows reach the surface, forming large volcanic provinces, such as Payenia in the southern Andes. This last case has very limited crustal melt along the axial part of the Andean roots, which shows incipient delamination. Based on these cases, a Palaeozoic flat slab is proposed with its subsequent steepening and widespread rhyolitic volcanism. The geological evolution of the Andes indicates that shallowing and steepening of the subduction zone are thus frequent processes which can be recognized throughout the entire system.

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Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Ancient Orogens and Modern Analogues

J. B. Murphy
J. B. Murphy
St Francis Xavier University, Canada
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J. D. Keppie
J. D. Keppie
Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico
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A. J. Hynes
A. J. Hynes
McGill University, Canada
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Geological Society of London
Volume
327
ISBN electronic:
9781862395756
Publication date:
January 01, 2009

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