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Surface and subsurface Palaeoseismic records at the ancient Roman City of Baelo Claudia and the Bolonia Bay area, Cádiz (south Spain)

By
Pablo G. Silva
Pablo G. Silva
Dpto. Geología, Universidad de Salamanca, Escuela Politécnica Superior de Ávila. C/Hornos Caleros, 50 05003-Ávila, Spain
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Klaus Reicherter
Klaus Reicherter
Institut für Neotektonik und Georisiken, RWTH Aachen University, Lochnerstr. 4-20, 52056 Aachen, Germany
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Christoph Grützner
Christoph Grützner
Institut für Neotektonik und Georisiken, RWTH Aachen University, Lochnerstr. 4-20, 52056 Aachen, Germany
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Teresa Bardají
Teresa Bardají
Dpto. Geología, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, 28871-Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain
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Javier Lario
Javier Lario
Dpto. Ciencias Analíticas, Fac. Ciencias. Universidad Nacional de Educación a distancia (UNED), 28040-Madrid, Spain
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Jose L. Goy
Jose L. Goy
Dpto. Geología, Universidad de Salamanca, Fac.Ciencias, 37008-Salamanca, Spain
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Cari Zazo
Cari Zazo
Dpto. Geología, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (CSIC), 28006-Madrid, Spain
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Peter Becker-Heidmann
Peter Becker-Heidmann
Institut für Bodenkunde, Universität Hamburg, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
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Published:
January 01, 2009

Abstract

The Roman archaeological site of Baelo Claudia (Cádiz, south Spain) is located within the Gibraltar Arch, a region with no significant recent or historical seismicity. However, previous studies have emphasized the occurrence of repeated strong archaeoseismic damage (intensity≥IX MSK) at Baelo Claudia tentatively bracketed in this study around ad 40–60 and ad 260–290. A multidisciplinary study has been carried out including the detailed mapping of surface deformation and building damage, surface geology and geomorphology, collection of structural data, and an extensive ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey. The obtained data are not conclusive when considered separately, but evident links between archaeoseismic damage, structural and GPR data indicate that the destruction of the city was linked to seismic shaking. The analysis of the pattern and orientation of deformation clearly indicates SW–NE directed compression due to ground shaking. This analysis also focuses on localized landslides and liquefaction processes, which appear to be coeval with the earthquakes, but the poor geotechnical parameters of the clayey substratum were determinant to amplify the observed level of destruction. The application of the present Spanish seismic code (NCSE-02) indicates that intensity VIII MSK (0.24–0.26 g) can be reached in this zone for 500 year return periods.

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Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Palaeoseismology: Historical and Prehistorical Records of Earthquake Ground Effects for Seismic Hazard Assessment

K. Reicherter
K. Reicherter
RWTH Aachen University, Germany
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A. M. Michetti
A. M. Michetti
Università dell’Insubria, Italy
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P. G. Silva
P. G. Silva
Universidad de Salamanca, Spain
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Geological Society of London
Volume
316
ISBN electronic:
9781862395640
Publication date:
January 01, 2009

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