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Book Chapter

Earthquake intensity assessment based on environmental effects: Principles and case studies

By
R. E. Tatevossian
R. E. Tatevossian
Institute of Physics of the Earth, RAS, ul. B. Gruzinskaya 10, Moscow 123995, Russia
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E. A. Rogozhin
E. A. Rogozhin
Institute of Physics of the Earth, RAS, ul. B. Gruzinskaya 10, Moscow 123995, Russia
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S. S. Arefiev
S. S. Arefiev
Institute of Physics of the Earth, RAS, ul. B. Gruzinskaya 10, Moscow 123995, Russia
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A. N. Ovsyuchenko
A. N. Ovsyuchenko
Institute of Physics of the Earth, RAS, ul. B. Gruzinskaya 10, Moscow 123995, Russia
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Published:
January 01, 2009

Abstract

The comparison of intensity assessments based on macroseismic data and Earthquake Environmental Effects (EEE) is presented. Specific problems faced when assessing intensities using different types of scales are discussed. Two case studies of recent earthquakes with magnitudes MS=7.4 (Altai, 2003, and Neftegorsk, 1995) are used to illustrate the applicability of the INQUA EEE scale. The Altai earthquake was accompanied by surface faulting of c. 70 km length and up to 2 m of horizontal and 70 cm of vertical offset; secondary EEE were observed over 3000 km2. The dominant type of surface faulting during the Neftegorsk earthquake was strike-slip. The length of surface faulting was up to 46 km, maximum horizontal offset was 8.1 m, and average offset coherent with seismic moment was 3.9 m; secondary EEE were observed occasionally at considerable distance from the epicentre on wet seashore sands. Application of the INQUA scale shows the epicentral intensity of the Altai earthquake to be X degrees. Most consistent with all types of data (rupture length, maximum and average offsets) intensity assessment for the Neftegorsk earthquake which is within the X–XI degree range. Taking into account environmental effects in intensity scales is an essential requirement: it follows from the complex nature of an earthquake impact, which spans a very broad frequency range, including static deformations. The case studies illustrate that the intensity assessment of an earthquake, based only on damage to buildings, will be essentially incomplete.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Palaeoseismology: Historical and Prehistorical Records of Earthquake Ground Effects for Seismic Hazard Assessment

K. Reicherter
K. Reicherter
RWTH Aachen University, Germany
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A. M. Michetti
A. M. Michetti
Università dell’Insubria, Italy
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P. G. Silva
P. G. Silva
Universidad de Salamanca, Spain
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Geological Society of London
Volume
316
ISBN electronic:
9781862395640
Publication date:
January 01, 2009

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