Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Cretaceous characiform fishes (Teleostei: Ostariophysi) from Northern Tethys: Description of new material from the Maastrichtian of Provence (Southern France) and palaeobiogeographical implications

By
O. Otero
O. Otero
Laboratoire de Géobiologie, Biochronologie et Paléontologie humaine, CNRS UMR 6046, Faculté des Sciences Fondamentales et Appliquées, Université de Poitiers, 40 av. du Recteur Pineau, F-86 022 Poitiers Cedex, France (e-mail: olga.otero@univ-poitiers.fr)
Search for other works by this author on:
X. Valentin
X. Valentin
Laboratoire de Géobiologie, Biochronologie et Paléontologie humaine, CNRS UMR 6046, Faculté des Sciences Fondamentales et Appliquées, Université de Poitiers, 40 av. du Recteur Pineau, F-86 022 Poitiers Cedex, France (e-mail: olga.otero@univ-poitiers.fr)
Search for other works by this author on:
G. Garcia
G. Garcia
Laboratoire de Géobiologie, Biochronologie et Paléontologie humaine, CNRS UMR 6046, Faculté des Sciences Fondamentales et Appliquées, Université de Poitiers, 40 av. du Recteur Pineau, F-86 022 Poitiers Cedex, France (e-mail: olga.otero@univ-poitiers.fr)
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2008

Abstract

The order Characiformes (Teleostei: Otophysi) is one of the most diverse freshwater fish groups. It contains around 1400 living species in South and Central America and Africa. Their fossil record starts in the Cretaceous on both continents and also in Europe. Here, we describe and discuss the occurrences of new characiform fish teeth from Provence (Maastrichtian, S. France). Five morphological types are recognized. They belong to possibly three different taxa, and they are regarded as Characiformes indet. However, two of them have resemblances to alestin fishes and could be related to the African family Alestidae. The characiform fishes from Provence are among the oldest known in Europe, together with a freshwater characiform fish occurring in Romania, and the recently described marine fish Sorbinicharax from Italy. The biogeographical history of characiform fishes has been intensively discussed during the last three decades. The group is generally accepted to be Gondwanan and its diversification linked with the break-up of this continent, with two main scenarios depending on whether the group is archaeo- or telolimnic. Some authors also propose a Pangaean origin. The recent discoveries of Sorbinicharax and of the fossils from Provence change our view on the Cretaceous characiform diversity and their early ecology, and they also enable us to re-evaluate the proposed biogeographical scenarios, reinforcing the hypothesis of the telolimny of the group.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Fishes and the Break-up of Pangaea

L. Cavin
L. Cavin
Museum d’Histoire de Naturelle, Genève, Switzerland
Search for other works by this author on:
A. Longbottom
A. Longbottom
Natural History Museum, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
M. Richter
M. Richter
Natural History Museum, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
295
ISBN electronic:
9781862395435
Publication date:
January 01, 2008

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal