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Shear velocity structure in the Aegean region obtained by joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves

By
E. E. Karagianni
E. E. Karagianni
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Geophysical Laboratory, PO Box 352-1, GR 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece (e-mail: elkarag@geo.auth.gr)
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C. B. Papazachos
C. B. Papazachos
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Geophysical Laboratory, PO Box 352-1, GR 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece (e-mail: elkarag@geo.auth.gr)
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Published:
January 01, 2007

Abstract

We present a shear velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle under the Aegean region by simultaneous inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves. The database consists of regional earthquakes recorded by portable broadband three-component digital stations that were installed for a period of 6 months in the broader Aegean region. For each epicentre–station ray path group velocity dispersion curves are measured using appropriate frequency time analysis (FTAN). The dispersion measurements for more than 600 Love wave paths have been used. We have also incorporated previous results for c. 700 Rayleigh wave paths for the study area. The single-path dispersion curves of both waves were inverted to regional group velocity maps for different values of period (6–32 s) via a tomographic method. The local dispersion curves of discrete grid points for both surface waves were inverted nonlinearly to construct 1D models of shear-wave velocity v. depth. In most cases the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves resulted in a single model (from the multiple models compatible with the data) that could interpret both Rayleigh and Love wave data. Around 60 local dispersion curves for both Rayleigh and Love waves were finally jointly inverted. As expected, because of the complex tectonic environment of the Aegean region the results show strong lateral variations of the S-wave velocities for the crust and uppermost mantle. Our results confirm the presence of a thin crust typically less than 28–30 km in the whole Aegean Sea, which in some parts of the southern and central Aegean Sea becomes significantly thinner (20–22 km). In contrast, a large crustal thickness of about 40–45 km exists in western Greece, and the remaining part of continental Greece is characterized by a mean crustal thickness of about 35 km. A significant sub-Moho upper mantle low-velocity zone (LVLmantle) with velocities as low as 3.7 km s−1, is clearly identified in the southern and central Aegean Sea, correlated with the high heat flow in the mantle wedge above the subducted slab and the related active volcanism in the region. The results obtained results are compared with independent body-wave tomographic information on the velocity structure of the study area and exhibit a generally good agreement, although significant small-scale differences are also identified.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

The Geodynamics of the Aegean and Anatolia

T. Taymaz
T. Taymaz
Istanbul Technical University, Turkey
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Y. Yilmaz
Y. Yilmaz
Kadir Has University, Istanbul, Turkey
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Y. Dilek
Y. Dilek
Miami University, Ohio, USA
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Geological Society of London
Volume
291
ISBN electronic:
9781862395398
Publication date:
January 01, 2007

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