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Doing and knowing: Charles Darwin and other travellers

By
S. Herbert
S. Herbert
University of Maryland Baltimore County
,
Department of History, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250
,
USA
(e-mail: herbert@umbc.edu)
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Published:
January 01, 2007

Abstract

In the 1830s, geology was a young discipline in the process of acquiring uniform standards. This study considers Charles Darwin's work in relation to that of other more practically and less academically oriented travellers. It suggests a continuity exists between the more practically and the more academically-minded groups in such projects as exploring, mining, map and chart making, collecting of specimens, and travel writing. It also highlights the role played by William Fitton as an academically-minded geologist whose instructions on collecting and observing were intended to raise standards for geologists. It suggests that such disciplinary improvements were not unique to geology but reflected a more general willingness at the time to instruct and be instructed.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Four Centuries of Geological Travel: The Search for Knowledge on Foot, Bicycle, Sledge and Camel

P. N. Wyse Jackson
P. N. Wyse Jackson
Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
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Geological Society of London
Volume
287
ISBN electronic:
9781862395350
Publication date:
January 01, 2007

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