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Two Tyrrells cross the Barren Lands of Canada, 1893

By
D. A. E. Spalding
D. A. E. Spalding
1105 Ogden Road, RR#1, Pender Island, British Columbia
,
Canada
,
V0N 2M1
(e-mail: david@davidspalding.com)
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Published:
January 01, 2007

Abstract

In May 1893 Joseph and James Tyrrell, sons of an Irish immigrant to Canada, left Edmonton in Canada's Northwest Territories with a group of voyageurs, partly aided by an aboriginal map and First Nations guides. By January 1894 the team had reached Winnipeg, Manitoba, completing the first expedition through the last large unexplored area of the mainland of Canada. The travellers suffered from many dangers, and the expedition was more than three months overdue when its members arrived at York Factory.

Some specimens were lost, but records and photographs acquired on the expedition form an important record of northern exploration. Joe Tyrrell identified the Keewatin centre of glaciation, and the post-glacial extension of the Hudson Bay basin is now known as the Tyrrell Sea. There was criticism at the apparent lack of economic benefit, but Tyrrell located iron ore and a possible copper-bearing area, and his work led indirectly to a productive nickel mine and the present working of diamonds. Tyrrell also documented the huge caribou herds, and the lives of the Inuit that depended on them.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Four Centuries of Geological Travel: The Search for Knowledge on Foot, Bicycle, Sledge and Camel

P. N. Wyse Jackson
P. N. Wyse Jackson
Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
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Geological Society of London
Volume
287
ISBN electronic:
9781862395350
Publication date:
January 01, 2007

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