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Book Chapter

Late Cretaceous Antarctic fish diversity

By
J. Kriwet
J. Kriwet
1
Museum of Natural History, Palaeontology, Humboldt-University Berlin, Invalidenstr. 43,10115 Berlin, Germany (e-mail: juergen.kriwet@museum.hu-berlin.de)
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J. M. Lirio
J. M. Lirio
2
Instituto Antártico Argentino, Cerrito 1248, Capital Federal (1010), Argentina
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H. J. Nuñez
H. J. Nuñez
2
Instituto Antártico Argentino, Cerrito 1248, Capital Federal (1010), Argentina
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E. Puceat
E. Puceat
3
UMR 5125 – CNRS, UFR Sciences de la Terre, Bat 402 (Géode), Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 27–43 Bd du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cédex, France
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C. Lécuyer
C. Lécuyer
3
UMR 5125 – CNRS, UFR Sciences de la Terre, Bat 402 (Géode), Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 27–43 Bd du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cédex, France
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Published:
January 01, 2006

Abstract

New material from the Santa Marta Formation (late Coniacian–?early Maastrichtian) of James Ross Island contributes significantly to the current knowledge of Late Cretaceous Antarctic fish diversity. The taxon list for the Santa Marta Formation is extended, and new records of neoselachians and teleosts are reported. The stratigraphic ranges of some previously known taxa are enlarged, and the palaeobiogeography and palaeoecology of Late Cretaceous Antarctic fishes are discussed. Top predators that occupied the higher levels in the food chain along with marine tetrapods dominate the marine faunas from the Santa Marta and López de Bertodano formations. The only fish adapted to crushing hard-shelled invertebrates were the chimeroids. Rays, an important component of marine fish associations, as well as fish from lower trophic levels, remain unknown from the Late Cretaceous of Antarctica.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Cretaceous–Tertiary High-Latitude Palaeoenvironments: James Ross Basin, Antarctica

J. E. Francis
J. E. Francis
University of Leeds, UK
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D. Pirrie
D. Pirrie
University of Exeter in Cornwall, UK
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J. A. Crame
J. A. Crame
British Antarctic Survey, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
258
ISBN electronic:
9781862395060
Publication date:
January 01, 2006

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