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Book Chapter

Reconciling the roles of climate and tectonics in Late Quaternary fan development on the Spartan piedmont, Greece

By
Richard J. J. Pope
Richard J. J. Pope
Division of Geographical Sciences, School of Education, Health and Sciences, University of Derby, Kedleston Road, Derby, DE22 1GB, UK (e-mail: R.J.Pope@Derby.ac.uk)
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Keith N. Wilkinson
Keith N. Wilkinson
Department of Archaeology, University College Winchester, Winchester S022 4NR, UK
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Published:
January 01, 2005

Abstract

The evolution of five alluvial fan systems is discussed in relation to chronology and possible tectonic and climatic triggering mechanisms. Two types of fan have evolved on the Spartan piedmont, Greece. First relatively large, low-angle fans, comprising four segments (Qf1–Qf4) composed of debris-flow and hyperconcentrated-flow deposits, with fluvial sediments restricted to the upper deposits of the distal segments. Second small, steep telescopically segmented fans, which consist of three segments (Qf1–Qf3), formed predominantly by debris-flow and hyperconcentrated-flow deposits. Morphological analysis of surface soils coupled with mineral magnetic and extractable iron (Fed) analyses of B-horizons suggest that individual segments can be correlated across the piedmont and have equivalent age. Luminescence dating of fine-grained deposits suggests that Qf1 segments formed during marine isotope stage (MIS) 6, Qf2 segments during MIS 5, Qf3 segments during MIS 4–2, and Qf4 segments during MIS 2 and 1. Tectonics has exerted a limited influence on fan systems. Regional uplift provides the gross relief conducive for fan development. The locations of fans were determined by transfer faults of Tertiary age, while Quaternary faulting initiated short phases of fan incision. Climate change as manifested by cycles of aridity and low vegetation cover during stadials, and humidity and deciduous woodland during interglacials and interstadials, played a key role in fan evolution during the later Middle and Upper Pleistocene. Aggradation occurred during stadials, with minor deposition and intermittent erosion during most interstadials, and entrenchment during the interglacials and longer interstadials. Deposition during the Holocene is limited in extent.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Alluvial Fans: Geomorphology, Sedimentology, Dynamics

A. M. Harvey
A. M. Harvey
University of Liverpool, UK
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A. E. Mather
A. E. Mather
University of Plymouth, UK
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M. Stokes
M. Stokes
University of Plymouth, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
251
ISBN electronic:
9781862394995
Publication date:
January 01, 2005

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