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Book Chapter

The need and context for sustainable mineral development

By
M. G. Petterson
M. G. Petterson
1
British Geological Survey, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
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B. R. Marker
B. R. Marker
2
Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, Eland House, Bressenden Place, London, SW1E 5DU, UK
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F. McEvoy
F. McEvoy
1
British Geological Survey, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
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M. Stephenson
M. Stephenson
1
British Geological Survey, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
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D. A. Falvey
D. A. Falvey
1
British Geological Survey, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
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Published:
January 01, 2005

Abstract

A special thematic conference was organized at the Geological Society of London in November 2003, aimed at bringing together experts in minerals development in the Developing Countries. Representatives of many aspects of mineral development attended, including mining companies, governments, aid agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), academics and consultants. The opening address to the conference is given in this paper. Mining is an ancient human activity developed through essential societal demand. As society and technology have developed, they have inevitably become ever-more materials hungry. This demand will remain for the foreseeable future. Many areas of the Developed World have depleted high-grade mineral deposits, and remaining resources are subject to strong environmental constraints. This increases pressure on the Developing World to generate the mineral commodities upon which society depends. Mineral resources are also a potential source of capital over which Developing Countries can have their own decision-making powers (in contrast to aid money for example). Sustainable mineral development is all about balance. Achieving the dynamic balance between supply and demand, equitable capital distribution, good financial and environmental management and governance, economics, and social stability is the challenge the world faces in the twenty-first century and beyond.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Sustainable Minerals Operations in the Developing World

B. R. Marker
B. R. Marker
Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, UK
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M. G. Petterson
M. G. Petterson
British Geological Survey, UK
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F. McEvoy
F. McEvoy
British Geological Survey, UK
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M. H. Stephenson
M. H. Stephenson
British Geological Survey, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
250
ISBN electronic:
9781862394988
Publication date:
January 01, 2005

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