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Book Chapter

Relevance of analogues for long-term prediction

By
Jean Louis Crovisier
Jean Louis Crovisier
ULP-EOST-CNRS, Centre de Géochimie de la Surface UMR 7517, Strasbourg, France jlc@illite.u-strasbg.fr
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Thierry Advocat
Thierry Advocat
CEA-VRH/DEN-DIEC/SCDV, Marcoule BP17171, Bagnols/Cèze, France
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Jean Luc Dussossoy
Jean Luc Dussossoy
CEA-VRH/DEN-DIEC/SCDV, Marcoule BP17171, Bagnols/Cèze, France
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Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

The long-term consequences on the environment of materials containing potentially toxic elements must be assessed on the basis of experimental data obtained over short time-scales and from models of the phenomena involved over several tens of thousands of years. Predicting the future is only possible through the study of collection of past events to infer a possible long-term behaviour. However, not everything we would like to predict has already occurred in the past, nor is it necessarily observable under perfectly similar circumstances. Considering natural or artificial analogues permits us to study materials that, even if not homologous, are similar or equivalent to some of the properties of the unknown materials. Examples presented in this paper illustrates the fact that some reactions observed in short-term experiments can be validated over the long term only by examining such natural analogues.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Energy, Waste and the Environment: a Geochemical Perspective

R. Gieré
R. Gieré
Universität Freiburg, Germany
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P. Stille
P. Stille
ULP-École et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre-CNRS, Strasbourg, France
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Geological Society of London
Volume
236
ISBN electronic:
9781862394841
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

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