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Magmatic flow paths and palaeomagnetism of the Miocene Stoddard Mountain laccolith, Iron Axis region, Southwestern Utah, USA

By
M. S. Petronis
M. S. Petronis
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA e-mail: mspetro@unm.edu
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D. B. Hacker
D. B. Hacker
Department of Geology, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242, USA
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D. K. Holm
D. K. Holm
Department of Geology, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242, USA
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J. W. Geissman
J. W. Geissman
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA e-mail: mspetro@unm.edu
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S. S. Harlan
S. S. Harlan
Environmental Sciences and Policy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

The Stoddard Mountain laccolith is part of a complex of Early Miocene laccoliths intruded along the western edge of the Colorado Plateau in the Iron Axis region of Southwestern Utah. Most Colorado Plateau laccoliths (e.g. Henry and La Sal Mountains) are considered to be fed by a central axial feeder system. However, detailed mapping in the Iron Axis region suggests that the Stoddard Mountain laccolith was fed laterally from the west. Structural and field data suggest the quartz monzonitic magma initially migrated laterally eastward at ∼1 km depth as a sill before spreading laterally north-south where it inflated to ∼1–1.5 km thickness. To test the model of a lateral feeder system, data were collected from 32 palaeomagnetic sites and 76 AMS stations (763 accepted specimens) sampled over the ∼54 km2 exposed part of the N-S oval-shaped laccolith. The in situ AMS fabrics, inferred to correlate with magmatic fabrics, typically show NE trending lineations in the north and S-SE trending lineations in the south part of the intrusion. The palaeomagnetic data are interpreted to indicate a very minimal amount of post-emplacement deformation of the intrusion. The overall lack of westerly-directed and steep magnetic lineations argues against emplacement via a central axial feeder system.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Magnetic Fabric: Methods and Applications

F. Martín-Hernández
F. Martín-Hernández
Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
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C. M. Lüneburg
C. M. Lüneburg
Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of New Orleans, USA
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C. Aubourg
C. Aubourg
Laboratoire de Tectonique, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France
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M. Jackson
M. Jackson
Institute for Rock Magnetism, University of Minnesota, USA
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Geological Society of London
Volume
238
ISBN electronic:
9781862394865
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

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