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Magnetic fabric: methods and applications — an introduction

By
F. Martín-Hernández
F. Martín-Hernández
Paleomagnetic Laboratory ‘Fort Hoofddijk’, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, 3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands
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C. M. Lüneburg
C. M. Lüneburg
Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of New Orleans, 2000 Lake Shore Drive, New Orleans, LA 70148, USA
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C. Aubourg
C. Aubourg
Laboratoire de Tectonique, UMR 7072, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, 95031, Cergy Cedes, France
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M. Jackson
M. Jackson
Institute for Rock Magnetism, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN 55455, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

Fifty years have now passed since Graham (1954) published his seminal paper advocating the use of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) as a rapid and sensitive petrofabric tool. During these five decades, Graham’s ‘under-exploited’ method has become standard, and AMS and related techniques are now routinely applied to characterizing fabrics in a wide variety of geological materials (e.g. the GEOREF database lists over 500 journal publications with ‘magnetic anisotropy’ as keywords).

Magnetic anisotropy works as a petrofabric tool because individual grains of most minerals are magnetically anisotropic, i.e. easier to magnetize in certain orientations, which are governed primarily by crystallography and/or grain shape. Magnetic anisotropy at the bulk rock scale results from the preferred crystallographic orientation (PCO) and/or preferred dimensional orientation (PDO) of anisotropic mineral grains. AMS can also result from magnetostatic interactions among closely spaced, strongly magnetic grains that are heterogeneously distributed in a matrix of more weakly magnetic minerals. In either case, magnetic anisotropy is directly related to some aspects of rock fabric, and thus it provides a quick, simple and effective characterization tool, even though the relationship between magnetic fabric and petrofabric is quite complex in detail.

The present collection of papers originated, in part, at a special session on magnetic fabrics at the Joint Assembly of the EGS-AGU-EUG (April 2003) in Nice, which highlighted recent methodological advances, theoretical and experimental studies, and characterization of flow and deformation fabrics in rocks and sediments. A similar session at the AGU Fall Meeting (December 2003) in San

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Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Magnetic Fabric: Methods and Applications

F. Martín-Hernández
F. Martín-Hernández
Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Search for other works by this author on:
C. M. Lüneburg
C. M. Lüneburg
Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of New Orleans, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
C. Aubourg
C. Aubourg
Laboratoire de Tectonique, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France
Search for other works by this author on:
M. Jackson
M. Jackson
Institute for Rock Magnetism, University of Minnesota, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
238
ISBN electronic:
9781862394865
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

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