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Book Chapter

Shear-wave anisotropy from dipole shear logs in oceanic crustal environments

By
G. J. Iturrino
G. J. Iturrino
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Borehole Research Group, Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964, USAIturrino@ldeo.columbia.edu
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D. Goldberg
D. Goldberg
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Borehole Research Group, Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964, USAIturrino@ldeo.columbia.edu
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H. Glassman
H. Glassman
Baker-Hughes, 2001 Rankin Road, Houston, TX 77073-5114, USA
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D. Patterson
D. Patterson
Baker-Hughes, 2001 Rankin Road, Houston, TX 77073-5114, USA
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Y.-F. Sun
Y.-F. Sun
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Borehole Research Group, Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964, USAIturrino@ldeo.columbia.edu
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G. Guerin
G. Guerin
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Borehole Research Group, Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964, USAIturrino@ldeo.columbia.edu
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S. Haggas
S. Haggas
Leicester University, Department of Geology, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
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Published:
January 01, 2005

Abstract

The deployment of a down-hole dipole shear sonic tool in Hole 395A and Hole 735B marked the first two opportunities to measure high-resolution shear-wave velocity and VS anisotropy profiles in oceanic crustal rocks. In Hole 395A near the Kane Fracture Zone, dipole sonic logs were recorded from 100–600 mbsf, and allow azimuthal anisotropy to be determined as a function of depth in the crust. The magnitude of VS anisotropy varies with depth, from less than 3.2% in low-porosity flows at the bottom of the hole, to approximately 15.5% in highly fractured pillow basalts and breccias. The orientation of the fast VS direction also varies over depth, with a mean value between 75°N and 80°E, and aligns with the strike of steeply dipping structures observed by down-hole electrical and acoustic images. This fast VS angle orientation is locally oblique to the plate-spreading direction and to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge axis. In Hole 735B, drilled near the Atlantis Fracture Zone, dipole sonic logs from 23 to 596 mbsf indicate that VS anisotropy varies with depth, with averages of 5.3% in the foliated and deformed gabbros recovered at the bottom of the hole; 4.5% in undeformed olivine and oxide-rich gabbros around 300 mbsf; and 6.8% in highly deformed mylonitic zones at shallow depths. The fast VS angle also varies with depth, giving a mean orientation of approximately S45°E for well-resolved estimates in the upper interval of the hole. This direction aligns with the strike of steeply dipping fractures observed by down-hole imaging, and is locally oblique to the Southwest Indian ridge axis. Although the effects of regional stresses and local deformation of these holes may introduce anisotropy in the dipole sonic data, we conclude that crustal morphology in the vicinity of the holes contributes significantly to the magnitude and orientation of VS anisotropy.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Petrophysical Properties of Crystalline Rocks

P. K. Harvey
P. K. Harvey
University of Leicester, UK
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T. S. Brewer
T. S. Brewer
University of Leicester, UK
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P. A. Pezard
P. A. Pezard
Université de Montpellier II, France
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V. A. Petrov
V. A. Petrov
IGEM, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia
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Geological Society of London
Volume
240
ISBN electronic:
9781862394889
Publication date:
January 01, 2005

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