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Carbon dioxide sequestration in the Campine Basin and the adjacent Roer Valley Graben (North Belgium): an inventory

By
B. Laenen
B. Laenen
Energy Department, Vito, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol, Belgiumben.laenen@vito.be
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P. Van Tongeren
P. Van Tongeren
Energy Department, Vito, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol, Belgiumben.laenen@vito.be
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R. Dreesen
R. Dreesen
Energy Department, Vito, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol, Belgiumben.laenen@vito.be
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M. Dusar
M. Dusar
Belgian Geological Survey, Jennerstraat 13, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
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Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

The Campine Basin offers a variety of potential CO2 storage sites. Within the Roer Valley Graben area Triassic Buntsandstein rocks have an estimated CO2 storage capacity of several hundred million tons. Mesozoic shales and younger sediments provide adequate sealing. Westphalian D sandstones may possess storage opportunities in the southern graben area, and the karstified/dolomitized parts of the Dinantian carbonates in the western sub-basin have an estimated CO2 storage capacity of 130 × 106 tons. In places, the Dinantian reservoirs may be combined with carbonate reservoirs in the underlying Devonian strata. Sealing is provided by Namurian shales and Westphalian coals and shales. Along the western and southern edge of the basin the Dinantian reservoir is sealed by Cretaceous chalks and marls.

Besides aquifers, the available coal qualifies for CO2 storage. Six Six methane target areas contain a producible enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM), volume of 53–79 × 109m3. This provides a minimum CO2 sequestration potential of 400 × 106 tons. ECBM development factors include the sedimentological setting of the coal sequence as well as changes in porosity, permeability and stress conditions induced by former mining activities. The CO2 storage capacity in abandoned coalmines is limited. Nevertheless, CO2 storage in the abandoned mines may be an option when it is combined with coalmine methane extraction or ECBM production in neighbouring areas.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Geological Storage of Carbon Dioxide

Shelagh J. Baines
Shelagh J. Baines
BP Exploration and Production Company, Sunbury, UK
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Richard H. Worden
Richard H. Worden
Department of Earth & Ocean Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
233
ISBN electronic:
9781862394810
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

GeoRef

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