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Seismic monitoring at the Sleipner underground CO2 storage site (North Sea)

By
Rob Arts
Rob Arts
TNO-NITG, PO Box 80015, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlandsr.arts@nitg.tno.nl
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Ola Eiken
Ola Eiken
Statoil Research Centre, Rotvoll, N-7005 Trondheim, Norway
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Andy Chadwick
Andy Chadwick
BGS, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG, UK
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Peter Zweigel
Peter Zweigel
SINTEF Petroleum Research, S.P. Andersens vei 15b, NO-7052 Trondheim, Norway
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Bert Van Der Meer
Bert Van Der Meer
TNO-NITG, PO Box 80015, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlandsr.arts@nitg.tno.nl
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Gary Kirby
Gary Kirby
BGS, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG, UK
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Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

The growing emissions of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, are seen worldwide as one of the major causes of climate change. International treaties like the Kyoto Protocol are supposed to contribute to reducing the emission of greenhouse gases. Underground sequestration has the potential to play an important role in keeping large volumes of CO2 from escaping into the atmosphere in the short term. The first case of industrial scale CO2 storage in the world (close to one million tonnes per year since 1996) is taking place at the Sleipner underground CO2 storage site in the North Sea offshore Norway. Careful monitoring of the behaviour of the storage facility is required to establish its safety. To this end, two time-lapse seismic surveys have been acquired; the first repeat survey was completed in October 1999 and the second in October 2001. The presence of CO2 beneath thin intra-shale layers within the reservoir has caused significant changes both in reflection amplitudes (up to a factor 10) and in travel time (more than 40ms) through the CO2 plume (the velocity push-down effect). Some aspects of the interpretation of these time-lapse seismic surveys will be presented here.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Geological Storage of Carbon Dioxide

Shelagh J. Baines
Shelagh J. Baines
BP Exploration and Production Company, Sunbury, UK
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Richard H. Worden
Richard H. Worden
Department of Earth & Ocean Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
233
ISBN electronic:
9781862394810
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

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