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The role of hydrogeological and geochemical trapping in sedimentary basins for secure geological storage of carbon dioxide

By
William D. Gunter
William D. Gunter
Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, Alberta, T6N 1E4, Canadagunter@arc.ab.ca
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Stefan Bachu
Stefan Bachu
Alberta Geological Survey, Edmonton, Alberta, T6B 2X3, Canada
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Sally Benson
Sally Benson
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, California, 94720, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

Sedimentary basins throughout the world are thick piles of lithified sediments that, in many cases, are the hosts for fossil fuel resources. They may become even more important in the future if they are used for the storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide. The efficiency of CO2 geological storage is determined by the structure of the sedimentary basins, which have an intricate plumbing system defined by the location of high and low permeability strata that control the flow of fluids throughout the basin and define ‘hydrogeological’ traps. The most secure type of hydrogeological trapping is found in ‘stratigraphic’ and ‘structural’ traps in oil and gas reservoirs that have held oil and gas for millions of years. Another form of hydrogeological trapping is ‘hydrodynamic’ trapping which has been recognized in saline aquifers of sedimentary basins that have extremely slow flow rates. A volume of carbon dioxide injected into a deep hydrodynamic trap may take millions of years to travel by buoyancy forces updip to reach the surface before it leaks back into the atmosphere. Moreover, as the carbon dioxide migrates towards the surface, it dissolves in the surrounding brine (‘solubility’ trapping) and may react geochemically with rock minerals to become permanently trapped in the sedimentary basin by ‘ionic’ or ‘mineral’ trapping. The efficiency of the CO2 geological storage in sedimentary basins depends on many factors, among the most important being CO2 buoyancy, formation water density, lithological heterogeneity and mineralogy. A risk analysis must be completed for each site chosen for the geological storage of CO2 to evaluate the trapping security.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Geological Storage of Carbon Dioxide

Shelagh J. Baines
Shelagh J. Baines
BP Exploration and Production Company, Sunbury, UK
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Richard H. Worden
Richard H. Worden
Department of Earth & Ocean Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
233
ISBN electronic:
9781862394810
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

GeoRef

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