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Tectonic evolution of Palaeozoic terranes in West Junggar, Xinjiang, NW China

By
Solomon Buckman
Solomon Buckman
1
School of Geoscience, Minerals and Civil Engineering, University of South Australia
,
Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095, Australia
solomon.buckman@unisa.edu.au
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Jonathan C. Aitchison
Jonathan C. Aitchison
2
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Hong Kong
,
Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR, China
jona@hku.hk
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Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

Nine separate Cambrian to Carboniferous terranes are recognized in West Junggar, northwest China. They were amalgamated as part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt which records accretion of continental, island-arc and oceanic terranes to Archaean-Proterozoic continental nuclei. Tangbale, Kekesayi, Ebinur and Mayila terranes (CambriaN–Silurian) evolved in intra-oceanic settings and docked, along a series of north-dipping subduction zones, on to the Laba terrane to their south. This southern continent was contiguous with lithosphere of the Kulumudi Ocean to the north. Devonian subduction on the northern edge of this ocean resulted in formation of a continental arc (Toli terrane) and accretionary complex (Kulumudi terrane). The Karamay terrane formed as an accretionary complex during the Carboniferous. The ophiolitic Sartuohai terrane was emplaced as mélange between Kulumudi and Karamay terranes during the Late Carboniferous. Subduction migrated southward, continuing beneath these terranes, resulting in the intrusion of I-type granites into the Toli, Kulumudi, Sartuohai and Karamay terranes. These granites are closely associated with epithermal and porphyry-style gold mineralization. Composite terranes either side of the Kulumudi Ocean collided in the Late Carboniferous, marking the final consolidation of Central Asia. Collision was accompanied by anorogenic granite and diabase dyke intrusion, followed by widespread latest Carboniferous to Permian extension, and subsequently the formation of the Junggar Basin. West Junggar has been further disrupted by Cenozoic strike-slip faulting along Junggar and Dalabute faults.

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Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Aspects of the Tectonic Evolution of China

J. Malpas
J. Malpas
The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
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C. J. N. Fletcher
C. J. N. Fletcher
The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
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J. R. Ali
J. R. Ali
The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
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J. C. Aitchison
J. C. Aitchison
The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
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Geological Society of London
Volume
226
ISBN electronic:
9781862394742
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

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