Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

New constraints on the timing of late Carboniferous–early Permian volcanism in the central North Sea

By
Michel Heeremans
Michel Heeremans
Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1047 Blindem, N-0316 Oslo, Norway (e-mail: j.i.faleide@geologi.uio.no)
Search for other works by this author on:
Martin J. Timmerman
Martin J. Timmerman
Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24/H.25, 14476 Golm, Germany
Search for other works by this author on:
Linda A. Kirstein
Linda A. Kirstein
School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Jan Inge Faleide
Jan Inge Faleide
Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1047 Blindem, N-0316 Oslo, Norway (e-mail: j.i.faleide@geologi.uio.no)
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

The Permo-Carboniferous evolution of the central North Sea is characterized by three main geological events: (1) the development of the West European Carboniferous Basin; (2) a period of basaltic volcanism during the Lower Rotliegend (latest Carboniferous–early Permian); and (3) the development of the Northern and Southern Permian Basins in late Permian times. The timing of the late Carboniferous–Permian basaltic volcanism in the North Sea is poorly constrained, as is the timing of extensional tectonic activity following the main phase of inversion during the Westphalian, due to the diachronous propagation of the Variscan deformation front. Results of high precision Ar-Ar dating on basalt samples taken from a core from exploration well 39/2–4 (Amerada Hess) in the UK sector of the central North Sea suggests that basaltic volcanism was active in the late Carboniferous, at c. 299 Ma. The presence of volcanics below the dated horizon suggests that the onset of Permo-Carboniferous volcanism in the central North Sea commenced earlier, probably at c. 310 Ma (Westphalian C). This is contemporaneous with other observations of tholeiitic volcanism in other parts of NW Europe, including the Oslo Graben, the NE German Basin, southern Sweden and Scotland. Interpretations of available seismic data show that main extensional faulting occurred after the volcanic activity, but the exact age of the fault activity is difficult to constrain with the data available.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Permo-Carboniferous Magmatism and Rifting in Europe

M. Wilson
M. Wilson
Leeds University, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
E.-R. Neumann
E.-R. Neumann
University of Oslo, Norway
Search for other works by this author on:
G. R. Davies
G. R. Davies
Vrije University, The Netherlands
Search for other works by this author on:
M. J. Timmerman
M. J. Timmerman
Universität Potsdam, Germany
Search for other works by this author on:
M. Heeremans
M. Heeremans
University of Oslo, Norway
Search for other works by this author on:
B. T. Larsen
B. T. Larsen
Norsk Hydro ASA/Saga Petroleum ASA, Norway
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
223
ISBN electronic:
9781862394711
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal