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Present morphology and depositional architecture of a sandy confined submarine system: the Golo turbidite system (eastern margin of Corsica)

By
Anne Gervais
Anne Gervais
Université Bordeaux I, Département de Géologie et Océanographie, UMR 5805 EPOC, 33405 Talence Cedex, France
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Bruno Savoye
Bruno Savoye
IFREMER, DRO/GM, Laboratoire Environnements Sédimentaires, BP70, 29280 Plouzané Cedex, France
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David J. W. Piper
David J. W. Piper
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic), Bedford Institute of Oceanography, PO Box 1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, B2Y 4A2 Canada
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Thierry Mulder
Thierry Mulder
Université Bordeaux I, Département de Géologie et Océanographie, UMR 5805 EPOC, 33405 Talence Cedex, France
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Michel Cremer
Michel Cremer
Université Bordeaux I, Département de Géologie et Océanographie, UMR 5805 EPOC, 33405 Talence Cedex, France
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Laetitia Pichevin
Laetitia Pichevin
Université Bordeaux I, Département de Géologie et Océanographie, UMR 5805 EPOC, 33405 Talence Cedex, France
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Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

The modern sandy Golo turbidite system (500 km2) is located in a confined basin on the eastern margin of Corsica. The Golo turbidite system is fed by a single river, which supplies coarse sand derived from active weathering of the neighbouring mountains. The late Quaternary deposits have been imaged using a closely spaced grid of 1000 km of sparker seismic-reflection profiles (line spacing close to 1.6 km, vertical resolution of 2m). The turbidite system is composed of four non-coalescent fans that were at times active simultaneously and of two small deposits onto the slope. The resulting sedimentation pattern is characterized by stacked turbidite deposits. At a regional scale, there is a continuum of fan morphologies and geometries from south to north. The use of both seismic and sedimentary facies, together with mapped seismic geometry of sedimentary bodies, allowed definition of four architectural elements: (1) submarine valley (canyon and gully), (2) sandy channel, (3) muddy levee, and (4) sandy lobe. Some of these architectural elements can be recognized at a scale that is comparable to outcrop examples. Features such as progressive lateral migration and avulsion, or complex longitudinal evolution (progradation and retrogradation), can also be accurately described. Despite the active tectonics along the studied margin, the main variations in sedimentation appear to be controlled by eustatic changes, pre-existing seafloor topography, and sediment source characteristics. The general pattern of sedimentation is controlled by the influence of a confining slope, leading to the predominance of aggradation and to specific morphology and architecture of sedimentary bodies.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Confined Turbidite Systems

S. A. Lomas
S. A. Lomas
Baker Atlas Geoscience, UK
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P. Joseph
P. Joseph
Institut Français du Petrole, France
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Geological Society of London
Volume
222
ISBN electronic:
9781862394704
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

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