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Fumarole migration and fluid geochemistry at Poás Volcano (Costa Rica) from 1998 to 2001

By
O. Vaselli
O. Vaselli
Department of Earth Sciences, Via G La Pira, 4-50121 Florence, Italy. (e-mail: orlando@steno.geo.unifi.it)CNR-Geosciences and Earth Resources, Via G. La Pira, 4-50121 Florence, Italy.
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F. Tassi
F. Tassi
Department of Earth Sciences, Via G La Pira, 4-50121 Florence, Italy. (e-mail: orlando@steno.geo.unifi.it)
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A. Minissale
A. Minissale
CNR-Geosciences and Earth Resources, Via G. La Pira, 4-50121 Florence, Italy.
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G. Montegrossi
G. Montegrossi
CNR-Geosciences and Earth Resources, Via G. La Pira, 4-50121 Florence, Italy.
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E. Duarte
E. Duarte
Volcano logical and Seismological Observatory, Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica.
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E. Fernández
E. Fernández
Volcano logical and Seismological Observatory, Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica.
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F. Bergamaschi
F. Bergamaschi
Department of Earth Sciences, Via G La Pira, 4-50121 Florence, Italy. (e-mail: orlando@steno.geo.unifi.it)
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Published:
January 01, 2003

Abstract

We report the results of a geochemical survey of fumaroles, thermal springs, and gas discharges from areas in and around the active crater lake of Poás volcano (Costa Rica) from February 1998 to February 2001. The springs are highly acidic-sulphate waters with temperatures approaching boiling point, whereas gas chemistry is characterized by typical magmatic species, such as SO2, HF, HC1, H2, and CO. From February 1998 new fumarolic fields formed inside the southern part of the crater. They moved anticlockwise from the S to the NE inner walls of the crater, while those located in the southern part of the crater and close to the pyroclastic cone south of the crater lake diminished or disappeared altogether, during 1999 and 2000. This shift was also characterized by chemical variation of the magmatic gas species. In spite of the chemical changes of fumaroles, the composition of the lake changed little during this time. This fact, together with the chemical profile with depth of the lake, suggests that the lake is a very efficient condenser of magmatic fluids. An apparent chemical stratification of the lake suggests that dilution with meteoric water is not complete, due to the presence of liquid sulphur at the lake bottom and/or due to the continuous influx of new magmatic components.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Volcanic Degassing

C. Oppenheimer
C. Oppenheimer
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D. M. Pyle
D. M. Pyle
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J. Barclay
J. Barclay
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Geological Society of London
Volume
213
ISBN electronic:
9781862394612
Publication date:
January 01, 2003

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