Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Calcrete morphology and karst development in the Upper Old Red Sandstone at Milton Ness, Scotland

By
Donna F. Balin
Donna F. Balin
University of Cambridge, Department of Earth Sciences, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2000

Abstract

The Upper Old Red Sandstone at Milton Ness, Scotland, is notable for its excellent preservation of calcrete textures, which are comparable with some of the best Quaternary examples. It is also significant for the implications that can be drawn from the association between karst and calcrete, with this example interpreted to have formed entirely within a semi-arid environment. Karst cavities were developed in a mature hardpan calcrete, generated in sandy fluvial sediments with associated aeolian deposits. Subsequent to karst cavity generation, clasts derived from the subaerially exposed hardpan were locally transported and deposited as a laterally traceable bed connecting the tops of all the cavities. Both this bed and the karst infills were subsequently recalcretized in the final phase of the profile's evolution. Although calcrete–karst associations often are interpreted as the alternation between semi-arid and humid climates, respectively, this example is interpreted to be a result of water accumulating on the nearly impervious hardpan surface under fairly constant semi-arid conditions, evidenced by the recalcretization of both the karst infill and the calcrete-derived breccia (‘boulder calcrete’). Additional substrate modification also has taken place by plant roots; the remarkable development of rhizoliths in these Old Red Sandstone sediments should emphasize the need to consider plant influence on other non-marine rocks of post-Silurian age.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

New Perspectives on the Old Red Sandstone

Geological Society of London
Volume
180
ISBN electronic:
9781862394285
Publication date:
January 01, 2000

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal