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Micropalaeontological and palaeomagnetic approaches to stratigraphic anomalies in rift basins: ODP Site 1109, Woodlark Basin

By
Johanna M. Resig
Johanna M. Resig
1
Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA(e-mail: jresig@soest.hawaii.edu)
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Gina M. Frost
Gina M. Frost
2
Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA
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Naoto Ishikawa
Naoto Ishikawa
3
School of Earth Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606–8501, Japan
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Russell C. B. Perembo
Russell C. B. Perembo
4
Department of Geology, University of Papua New Guinea, University PO, Box 414, Papua New Guinea
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Published:
January 01, 2001

Abstract

The Stratigraphic succession of the western Woodlark Basin is examined in detail relative to ODP Site 1109, where c.55 m of Pliocene sediment lies anomalously shallow owing to slumping between c.1.10 and 0.65 Ma in the tectonically active rift basin. Palaeomagnetic reversals and varying percentages of the characteristic microfossils, Globigerinoides fistulosus and discoasters, within the deformed sediment defining the slump indicate that the Pliocene sediment was periodically introduced by a number of slumps rather than being emplaced by a single slump event. Palaeomagnetic and biostratigraphic events in the remainder of the hemipelagic section of Site 1109 to c. 4 Ma appear undisturbed and consistent with those at adjoining sites. Globorotalia truncatulinoides >first appeared between 2.65 and 2.71 Ma at these low-latitude sites, which extends the previously reported area of evolution of the species in the southwestern Pacific toward the Equator. Seven of the nine coiling changes in Pulleniatinathrough time are recognized and dated using sedimentation rates. Along with palaeomagnetic events and microfossil species datum levels, these coiling changes can be used to correlate between sites in the area.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Non-Volcanic Rifting of Continental Margins: A Comparison of Evidence from Land and Sea

R. C. L. Wilson
R. C. L. Wilson
The Open University, UK
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R. B. Whitmarsh
R. B. Whitmarsh
Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
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B. Taylor
B. Taylor
University of Hawaii, Hawaii
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N. Froitzheim
N. Froitzheim
University of Bonn, Germany
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Geological Society of London
Volume
187
ISBN electronic:
9781862394353
Publication date:
January 01, 2001

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