Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Annual sediment budgets in an unstable gravel-bed river: the River Coquet, northern England

By
I. C. Fuller
I. C. Fuller
Division of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Northumbria at Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST, UK (e-mail Ian.Fuller@unn.ac.uk)
Search for other works by this author on:
D. G. Passmore
D. G. Passmore
Department of Geography, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
G. L. Heritage
G. L. Heritage
Division of Geography, School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester M5 4WT, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
A. R. G. Large
A. R. G. Large
Department of Geography, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
D. J. Milan
D. J. Milan
Geography and Environmental Management Research Unit, University of Gloucestershire, Cheltenham GL50 4AZ
Search for other works by this author on:
P. A. Brewer
P. A. Brewer
Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences, University of Wales, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion SY23 3DB, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2002

Abstract

Sediment budgeting procedures based on analysis of three-dimensional morphological change provide a useful mechanism by which rates and patterns of fluvial sediment erosion, transfer and deposition can be monitored. This paper presents results from an annual sediment budgeting programme established in a 1-km long piedmont reach of the gravel-bed River Coquet in Northumberland, northern England. The study reach has a locally braided channel planform and has experienced lateral instability over at least the past 150 years. Annual sediment budgets for 1997–1998 and 1998–1999 have been based on tacheometric survey of: (i) 15 monumented channel cross-profiles; and (ii) channel margins and gravel-bar morphology. Survey data have been analysed for each discrete morphological unit (differentiating channel and complex bar assemblages) within 17 sub-reaches of the study reach using Arc/Info™ GIS. The morphological sediment budgeting techniques used to generate these reach-scale budgets may be particularly valuable in unstable gravel-bed rivers due to the inherent difficulties in measuring bed-load transport. The results show considerable variability in rates and patterns of within-reach sediment transfer between the successive surveys. The channel at Holystone is characterized by substantial within-reach sediment transfer, with minimal net export downstream. This behaviour appears to be characteristic of UK gravel-bed piedmont rivers.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Sediment Flux to Basins: Causes, Controls and Consequences

S.J. Jones
S.J. Jones
University of Durham, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
L.E. Frostick
L.E. Frostick
University of Hull, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
191
ISBN electronic:
9781862394391
Publication date:
January 01, 2002

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal