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Tectonic control on changes in sediment supply: Quaternary alluvial systems, Körös sub-basin, SE Hungary

By
Edit Thamó-Bozsó
Edit Thamó-Bozsó
Rock Deformation Laboratory, Earth Sciences Department, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK (email: ernie.rutter@man.ac.uk)
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Zsolt Kercsmár
Zsolt Kercsmár
Reactivation Research Group, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
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Annamária Nádor
Annamária Nádor
Rock Deformation Research, Earth Sciences Department, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
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Published:
January 01, 2002

Abstract

The Pannonian Basin of Hungary is Europe's largest inter-mountain basin, where an evolution in drainage development patterns during the Quaternary was caused by changes in sediment flux to the basin, the dynamics of basin morphology development and the uplift history of the Apuseni Mountains source area, all directly or indirectly related to the tectonic systems operating in the region. Micro-mineralogical data of detrital heavy minerals from modern rivers and two key boreholes covering a time span from the present back to 2.6 Ma have been grouped by statistical analysis into two main clusters and some sub-clusters. The samples within the same cluster have a similar composition, and originated from the same source area. Based on the similar palaeogeographical setting of the potential source areas during the Quaternary, it has been possible to extrapolate the present transport directions of the rivers with a well-known catchment area geology and the heavy mineral composition to Pleistocene borehole data. The changes in transport directions were clearly sharp and related to significant changes in the uplift history of the Apuseni Mountains catchment area. During the Pliocene and Early Pleistocene the compressional stress field operating in the East Carpathians region resulted in the thrust-driven uplift of the Apuseni Mountains and the formation of a syn-sedimentary trap at the western margin of the source area, which captured the sediments of short, transverse rivers. During this period the drainage of the study area was characterized by axial drainage parallel to this trap, and sediments were transported from

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Sediment Flux to Basins: Causes, Controls and Consequences

S.J. Jones
S.J. Jones
University of Durham, UK
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L.E. Frostick
L.E. Frostick
University of Hull, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
191
ISBN electronic:
9781862394391
Publication date:
January 01, 2002

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