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The Triassic Sherwood Sandstone aquifer in Northern Ireland: constraint of a groundwater flow model for resource management

By
G. W. McNeill
G. W. McNeill
Environmental Engineering Research Centre, School of Civil Engineering, The Queen’s University of Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, UK G. McNeill@qub.ac.uk
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A. A. Cronin
A. A. Cronin
Environmental Engineering Research Centre, School of Civil Engineering, The Queen’s University of Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, UK G. McNeill@qub.ac.uk
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Y. Yang
Y. Yang
Environmental Engineering Research Centre, School of Civil Engineering, The Queen’s University of Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, UK G. McNeill@qub.ac.uk
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T. Elliot
T. Elliot
Environmental Engineering Research Centre, School of Civil Engineering, The Queen’s University of Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, UK G. McNeill@qub.ac.uk
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R. M. Kalin
R. M. Kalin
Environmental Engineering Research Centre, School of Civil Engineering, The Queen’s University of Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, UK G. McNeill@qub.ac.uk
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Published:
January 01, 2000

Abstract

The most important aquifer in Northern Ireland is the Triassic Sherwood Sandstone formation that lies under the urban area of Belfast and the areas to the east (Newtownards) and south (Lagan Valley) of the city. The management of this groundwater resource is important in providing a sustainable supply for both public and industrial users. A groundwater flow model that collated relevant meteorological, hydrological and hydrogeological information for the Lagan Valley and Newtownards areas was developed. This conceptual model was coupled with geochemical and isotopic data (using inverse modelling) to constrain the groundwater flow parameters. The results of 14C-dating suggest some of the groundwater in the aquifer may be up to 4000 years old, and that structural controls play a major role in both the flow rate and the spatial distribution of groundwater within the Sherwood Sandstone aquifer.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Groundwater in the Celtic Regions: Studies in Hard Rock and Quaternary Hydrogeology

N. S. Robins
N. S. Robins
British Geological Survey, Wallingford, UK
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B. D. R. Misstear
B. D. R. Misstear
University of Dublin, Trinity College, Ireland
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Geological Society of London
Volume
182
ISBN electronic:
9781862394308
Publication date:
January 01, 2000

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