Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Groundwater in the Celtic regions

By
N. S. Robins
N. S. Robins
British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
B. D. R. Misstear
B. D. R. Misstear
Department of Civil, Structural & Environmental Engineering, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2000

Abstract

The Celtic regions of Britain and Ireland have a complex and diverse geology which supports a range of regionally and locally important bedrock aquifers and unconsolidated Quaternary aquifers. In bedrock, aquifer units are often small and groundwater flow paths short and largely reliant on fracture flow. Groundwater has fulfilled an important social role throughout history, and is now enjoying renewed interest. Groundwater quality is generally favourable and suitable for drinking with minimal treatment. However, many wells are vulnerable to microbiological and chemical pollutants from point sources such as farmyards and septic tank systems, and nitrate concentrations from diffuse agricultural sources are causing concern in certain areas. Contamination by rising minewaters in abandoned coalfields and in the vicinity of abandoned metal mines is also a problem in some of the Celtic lands.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Groundwater in the Celtic Regions: Studies in Hard Rock and Quaternary Hydrogeology

N. S. Robins
N. S. Robins
British Geological Survey, Wallingford, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
B. D. R. Misstear
B. D. R. Misstear
University of Dublin, Trinity College, Ireland
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
182
ISBN electronic:
9781862394308
Publication date:
January 01, 2000

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal