Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

The geological evolution and hydrocarbon potential of the Barents and Kara shelves

By
A. V. Stoupakova
A. V. Stoupakova
Lomonosov Moscow State University, Geological Faculty, Moscow, RussiaStatoil, Harstad, Norway
Search for other works by this author on:
E. Henriksen
E. Henriksen
Statoil, Harstad, Norway
Search for other works by this author on:
Yu. K. Burlin
Yu. K. Burlin
Lomonosov Moscow State University, Geological Faculty, Moscow, Russia
Search for other works by this author on:
G. B. Larsen
G. B. Larsen
Statoil, Harstad, Norway
Search for other works by this author on:
J. K. Milne
J. K. Milne
Statoil, Harstad, Norway
Search for other works by this author on:
T. A. Kiryukhina
T. A. Kiryukhina
Lomonosov Moscow State University, Geological Faculty, Moscow, Russia
Search for other works by this author on:
P. O. Golynchik
P. O. Golynchik
Lomonosov Moscow State University, Geological Faculty, Moscow, Russia
Search for other works by this author on:
S. I. Bordunov
S. I. Bordunov
Lomonosov Moscow State University, Geological Faculty, Moscow, Russia
Search for other works by this author on:
M. P. Ogarkova
M. P. Ogarkova
Lomonosov Moscow State University, Geological Faculty, Moscow, Russia
Search for other works by this author on:
A. A. Suslova
A. A. Suslova
Lomonosov Moscow State University, Geological Faculty, Moscow, Russia
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2011

Abstract

All of the Arctic Eurasian Basins – the Barents and Kara Seas and the adjacent parts of the Pechora and West Siberian basins – have intracratonic settings and were affected by phases of intracratonic rifting during Riphean, Early Palaeozoic, Devonian–Early Carboniferous, Early Triassic, Jurassic and Cenozoic times. Often these stages were simultaneous at remote areas. The rifting led to the development of extensional sag basins giving thick sedimentary complexes associated with linear rifts and creating trends favourable for hydrocarbon generation. These trends are defined by the major fault complexes bordering them and include linear positive inverted structures and thick sedimentary complexes. The tectonic processes within these trends influenced the later structuring of the whole basin and the distribution of hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbon generation started long before the present basins’ structural configuration formed, and oil and gas kitchens were associated mainly with extensional parts of the basins. Later phases of rifting and extension affected both the ancient oil and gas kitchens and the younger ones. Inversion caused trapping and affected fluid migration, mixing the petroleum systems. Inverted structures in the old rifts have the highest potential for large hydrocarbons accumulations but, in highly uplifted areas affected by faulting and erosion, exploration risk is high.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Memoirs

Arctic Petroleum Geology

Anthony M. Spencer
Anthony M. Spencer
Statoil, Norway
Search for other works by this author on:
Ashton F. Embry
Ashton F. Embry
Geological Survey of Canada, Canada
Search for other works by this author on:
Donald L. Gautier
Donald L. Gautier
United States Geological Survey, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Antonina V. Stoupakova
Antonina V. Stoupakova
Moscow State University, Russia
Search for other works by this author on:
Kai Sørensen
Kai Sørensen
Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
35
ISBN electronic:
9781862394100
Publication date:
January 01, 2011

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal