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Sedimentary successions of the Arctic Region (58–64° to 90°N) that may be prospective for hydrocarbons

By
Arthur Grantz
Arthur Grantz
Consulting Geologist, c/o US Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road (M.S. 969), Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA
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Robert A. Scott
Robert A. Scott
CASP, University of Cambridge, 181a Huntingdon Road, Cambridge CB3 ODH, UK
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Sergey S. Drachev
Sergey S. Drachev
P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, RussiaPresent address: ExxonMobil International Ltd, ExxonMobil House, MP44 Ermyn Way, Leatherhead, Surrey KT22 8UX, UK
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Thomas E. Moore
Thomas E. Moore
US Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road (M.S. 969), Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA
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Zenon C. Valin
Zenon C. Valin
US Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road (M.S. 969), Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2011

Abstract

A total of 143 sedimentary successions that contain, or may be prospective for, hydrocarbons were identified in the Arctic Region north of 58–64°N and mapped in four quadrants at a scale of 1:11 000 000. Eighteen of these successions (12.6%) occur in the Arctic Ocean Basin, 25 (17.5%) in the passive and sheared continental margins of the Arctic Basin and 100 (70.0%) on the Circum-Arctic continents of which one (<1%) lies in the active margin of the Pacific Rim. Each succession was assigned to one of 13 tectono-stratigraphic and morphologic classes and coloured accordingly on the map. The thickness of each succession and that of any underlying sedimentary section down to economic basement, where known, are shown on the map by isopachs. Major structural or tectonic features associated with the creation of the successions, or with the enhancement or degradation of their hydrocarbon potential, are also shown. Forty-four (30.8%) of the successions are known to contain hydrocarbon accumulations, 64 (44.8%) are sufficiently thick to have generated hydrocarbons and 35 (24.5%) may be too thin to be prospective.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Memoirs

Arctic Petroleum Geology

Anthony M. Spencer
Anthony M. Spencer
Statoil, Norway
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Ashton F. Embry
Ashton F. Embry
Geological Survey of Canada, Canada
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Donald L. Gautier
Donald L. Gautier
United States Geological Survey, USA
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Antonina V. Stoupakova
Antonina V. Stoupakova
Moscow State University, Russia
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Kai Sørensen
Kai Sørensen
Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland
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Geological Society of London
Volume
35
ISBN electronic:
9781862394100
Publication date:
January 01, 2011

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