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Book Chapter

Evolutionary trajectories of a redundant feature: lessons from bivalve gill abfrontal cilia and mucocyte distributions

By
Peter G. Beninger
Peter G. Beninger
1
Laboratoire de Biologie Marine, Faculté des Sciences, Université de Nantes, 44322 Nantes Cédex France (e-mail: Peter.Beninger@isomer.univ-nantes.fr)
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Suzanne C. Dufour
Suzanne C. Dufour
2
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0202, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2000

Abstract

Recent data on the distributions of cilia and mucocytes on the bivalve gill abfrontal surface are analysed with respect to evolutionary relationships of the principal autobranch gill types. From the primitive function as a mucociliary cleaning surface in the protobranchs, two evolutionary trajectories are evident: (1) progressive reduction of both cilia and mucocytes with resultant loss of surface function, seen in the homorhabdic filibranchs studied; (2) reduction of cilia but retention or increase in acid mucopolysaccharide-secreting (AMPS) mucocyte density in the eulamellibranchs, corresponding to the assumption of a new function, probably in the reduction of frictional resistance to flow in the water canals. Heterorhabdic gill abfrontal surfaces present a mixture of these characteristics: reduction of cilia and mucocytes on the ordinary filaments, and retention of both on the principal filaments. The retention of AMPS mucocytes on the abfrontal surface of the pseudolamellibranchs may be related to the degree of interlamellar fusion, reducing frictional resistance to water flow as in the eulamellibranchs. The gill abfrontal surface thus constitutes an excellent candidate for the study of the different evolutionary options and trajectories of a redundant feature.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

The Evolutionary Biology of the Bivalvia

E. M. Harper
E. M. Harper
Cambridge University, UK
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J. D. Taylor
J. D. Taylor
The Natural History Museum, UK
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J. A. Crame
J. A. Crame
British Antarctic Survey, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
177
ISBN electronic:
9781862394254
Publication date:
January 01, 2000

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