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Functional anatomy of the digestive system of Neoteredo reynei (Bartsch, 1920) and Psiloteredo healdi (Bartsch, 1931) (Bivalvia: Teredinidae)

By
Sônia G. B. C. Lopes
Sônia G. B. C. Lopes
Departamento de Zoologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, PO Box 11.461, CEP 05422-970, São Paulo, Brazil (e-mail: sonialop@uol.com.br)
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Osmar Domaneschi
Osmar Domaneschi
Departamento de Zoologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, PO Box 11.461, CEP 05422-970, São Paulo, Brazil (e-mail: sonialop@uol.com.br)
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Daniela T. De Moraes
Daniela T. De Moraes
Departamento de Zoologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, PO Box 11.461, CEP 05422-970, São Paulo, Brazil (e-mail: sonialop@uol.com.br)
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Marisa Morita
Marisa Morita
Departamento de Zoologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, PO Box 11.461, CEP 05422-970, São Paulo, Brazil (e-mail: sonialop@uol.com.br)
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Georgeana De L. C. Meserani
Georgeana De L. C. Meserani
Departamento de Zoologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, PO Box 11.461, CEP 05422-970, São Paulo, Brazil (e-mail: sonialop@uol.com.br)
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Published:
January 01, 2000

Abstract

Studies on the digestive system of the Teredinidae are useful for a better understanding of the evolution of these bivalves in relation to the xylophagous habit. Neoteredo reynei and Psiloteredo healdi, two common species in Brazilian mangroves, have evolved differently in their methods to use wood as food, despite the similarities in the anatomy and functioning of their globular type II stomachs. N. reynei is predominantly xylophagous throughout its life, while P. healdi, despite its predominant suspension-feeding habit, uses wood more efficiently as the animal grows older. The outstanding differences that allow these conclusions are the large size of the appendix and anal canal in N. reynei, always conspicuous and packed with wood, and the small appendix of P. healdi, which increases in size with age. Based on anatomical data and revision of the literature, it is suggested that in both species the appendix, and also the anal canal in N. reynei, is of primary importance in the digestion of wood and absorption of nutrients, counterbalancing the reduced specialized digestive diverticula.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

The Evolutionary Biology of the Bivalvia

E. M. Harper
E. M. Harper
Cambridge University, UK
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J. D. Taylor
J. D. Taylor
The Natural History Museum, UK
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J. A. Crame
J. A. Crame
British Antarctic Survey, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
177
ISBN electronic:
9781862394254
Publication date:
January 01, 2000

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