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Tectonically enhanced forced regressions: examples from growth folds in extensional and compressional settings, the Miocene of the Suez rift and the Eocene of the Pyrenees

By
Robert L. Gawthorpe
Robert L. Gawthorpe
Basin & Stratigraphic Studies Group, Department of Earth Sciences, University of ManchesterManchester M13 9PL,UK
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Matt Hall
Matt Hall
Basin & Stratigraphic Studies Group, Department of Earth Sciences, University of ManchesterManchester M13 9PL,UK Present address: Statoil, Exploration & Production DivisionN-4035 Stavanger, Norway
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Ian Sharp
Ian Sharp
Basin & Stratigraphic Studies Group, Department of Earth Sciences, University of ManchesterManchester M13 9PL,UK Present address: Norsk Hydro Research CentreSandsliveien 90, N-5020 Bergen, Norway
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Tom Dreyer
Tom Dreyer
Present address: Norsk Hydro Research CentreSandsliveien 90, N-5020 Bergen, Norway
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Published:
January 01, 2000

Abstract

This paper examines the stratal geometries and facies stacking patterns associated with forced regressions around fault-propagation folds in extensional and compressional settings. Case studies are documented from: (i) the Miocene of the Suez rift and (ii) the Eocene of the Ainsa piggyback basin, Pyrenees. Despite the different tectonic settings, the stratal geometries and facies stacking patterns are remarkably similar. Distinctive sharp-based shoreface sandstones, formed as a result of forced regression, were deposited around growth anticlines. The forced regressive shoreface sandstones ‘shale-out’ rapidly basinward away from the growth anticlines and sit abruptly within offshore mudstones of highstand (HST) and transgressive (TST) systems tracts along the flanks of the growth anticlines.

As fold amplification proceeded, older sandbodies were rotated to dip more steeply, and there is commonly a 2–5° angular difference between successive forced regressive sandbodies. This progressive tilting, coupled with marine erosion during relative sea-level fall has completely removed HST and TST deposits near anticline crets, and led to vertical amalgamation of individual forced regressive sandbodies. The resulting stratal geometries clearly result from the tectonic enhancement of forced regression.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Sedimentary Responses to Forced Regressions

D. Hunt
D. Hunt
The University of Manchester, UK
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R. L. Gawthorpe
R. L. Gawthorpe
The University of Manchester, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
172
ISBN electronic:
9781862394209
Publication date:
January 01, 2000

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