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Book Chapter

The Blaini Formation of the Lesser Himalaya, NW India

By
James L. Etienne
James L. Etienne
Present address: Neftex Petroleum Consultants Ltd, 97 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 4RY, UKGeologisches Institut, Departement Erdwissenschaften, ETH-Zentrum, Haldenbachstrasse 44, CH-8092, Zürich, Switzerland
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Philip A. Allen
Philip A. Allen
Department of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
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Erwan le Guerroué
Erwan le Guerroué
Géosciences Rennes (UMR 6118 – CNRS), 263 Avenue du General Leclerc. CS 74205, Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex, France
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Larry Heaman
Larry Heaman
Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, 1–26 Earth Sciences Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E3, Canada
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Sumit K. Ghosh
Sumit K. Ghosh
Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, 33 General Mahadeo Singh Road, Dehra Dun, Uttarakhand, India
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Rafique Islam
Rafique Islam
Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, 33 General Mahadeo Singh Road, Dehra Dun, Uttarakhand, India
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Published:
January 01, 2011

Abstract

Neoproterozoic glaciogenic deposits crop out widely across the Lesser Himalaya fold and thrust belt in NW India. Underlain by the siliciclastic Simla and Jaunsar Groups, the Blaini Formation (Fm.) includes at least two thick and regionally extensive diamictite units, separated by siliciclastics and argillites and capped by a pink microcrystalline dolomite. A glaciogenic origin is supported by the presence of relatively abundant striated clasts and the local preservation of polished and striated pavement on underlying Simla Group clastics. The cap dolostone is isotopically light with respect to both 13C and 18O, which show strong covariance. The Blaini is ubiquitously deformed, incorporated in regional-scale folds and thrusts, and exhibits locally intensive intra-formational deformation. Until recently, geochronological constraints have remained poor, but new detrital zircon ages from diamictite samples provide a maximum age limit of 692±18 Ma (207Pb/206Pb). Reliable palaeomagnetic data are required to constrain the position of this important passive continental margin in palaeogeographical reconstructions.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Memoirs

The Geological Record of Neoproterozoic Glaciations

Emmanuelle Arnaud
Emmanuelle Arnaud
University of Guelph, Canada
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Galen P. Halverson
Galen P. Halverson
McGill University, Canada
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Graham Shields-Zhou
Graham Shields-Zhou
University College London, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
36
ISBN electronic:
9781862394117
Publication date:
January 01, 2011

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