Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

4D seismic imaging of an injected CO2 plume at the Sleipner Field, central North Sea

By
R.A. Chadwick
R.A. Chadwick
British Geological Survey, Kings ley Dunham Centre, Key worth, Nottingham, United Kingdom, NG12 5GG (e-mail: rach@bgs.ac.uk)
Search for other works by this author on:
R. Arts
R. Arts
Netherlands Institute of Applied Geoscience TNO-National Geological Survey, Kriekenpitplein 18, PO Box 80015, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands
Search for other works by this author on:
O. Eiken
O. Eiken
Statoil Research Centre, Rorvoll, N-7005 Trondheim, Norway
Search for other works by this author on:
G. A. Kirby
G. A. Kirby
British Geological Survey, Kings ley Dunham Centre, Key worth, Nottingham, United Kingdom, NG12 5GG (e-mail: rach@bgs.ac.uk)
Search for other works by this author on:
E. Lindeberg
E. Lindeberg
Sintef Petroleum Research, N-7465 Trondheim, Norway
Search for other works by this author on:
P. Zweigel
P. Zweigel
Sintef Petroleum Research, N-7465 Trondheim, Norway
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

CO2 produced at the Sleipner field is being injected into the Utsira Sand, a major saline aquifer. Time-lapse seismic data acquired in 1999, with 2.35 million tonnes of CO2 in the reservoir, image the CO2, plume as a number of bright sub-horizontal reflections. These are interpreted as tuned responses from thin (< 8 m thick) layers of CO2 trapped beneath intra-reservoir shales. A prominent vertical ‘chimney’ of CO2 appears to be the principal feeder of these layers in the upper part of the reservoir. Amplitude-thickness scaling for each layer, followed by a layer summation, indicates that roughly 80% of the total injected CO2 is concentrated in the layers. The remainder is interpreted to occupy the feeder ‘chimneys’ and dispersed clouds between the layers. A prominent velocity pushdown is evident beneath the CO2 accumulations. Velocity estimation using the Gassmann relationships suggests that the observed pushdown cannot readily be explained by CO2 present only at high saturations in the thin layers; a minor proportion of low saturation CO2 is also required. This is consistent with the layer volume summation, but significant uncertainty remains.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Memoirs

3D Seismic Technology: Application to the Exploration of Sedimentary Basins

Richard J. Davies
Richard J. Davies
Cardiff University, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Joseph A. Cartwright
Joseph A. Cartwright
Cardiff University, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Simon A. Stewart
Simon A. Stewart
BP, Azerbaijan
Search for other works by this author on:
Mark Lappin
Mark Lappin
ExxonMobil Exploration Company, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
John R. Underhill
John R. Underhill
The University of Edinburgh, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
29
ISBN electronic:
9781862394049
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal