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Seismic characteristics of large-scale sandstone intrusions in the Paleogene of the South Viking Graben, UK and Norwegian North Sea

By
Mads Huuse
Mads Huuse
3D Lab, School of Earth, Ocean and Planetary Sciences, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3YE, UK (e-mail: m.huuse@earth.cfac.uk)
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Davide Duranti
Davide Duranti
Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, University of Aberdeen, UK
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Noralf Steinsland
Noralf Steinsland
Statoil ASA, Forushagen, 4035 Stavanger, Norway
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Claudia G. Guargena
Claudia G. Guargena
Enterprise Oil Norge, now at A/S Norske Shell, P.O. Box 40, 4098 Tananger, Norway
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Philippe Prat
Philippe Prat
TotalFinaElf Petroleum Norge, Finnestadveien 44, Dusavika, 4029 Stavanger, Norway
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Kristine Holm
Kristine Holm
TotalFinaElf Petroleum Norge, Finnestadveien 44, Dusavika, 4029 Stavanger, Norway
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Joseph A. Cartwright
Joseph A. Cartwright
3D Lab, School of Earth, Ocean and Planetary Sciences, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3YE, UK (e-mail: m.huuse@earth.cfac.uk)
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Andrew Hurst
Andrew Hurst
Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, University of Aberdeen, UK
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Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

Post-depositional remobilization and injection of sand can significantly change the geometry of deepwater clastic reservoirs. Features associated with these processes are particularly well developed in the lower Paleogene of the South Viking Graben of the UK and Norwegian North Sea. Seismic scale sandstone intrusions can be grouped in two classes. Class 1 comprises low-angle (20-40 degrees) tabular sandstone intrusions emanating from steep-sided in situ sand bodies within the Balder Formation. The intrusions may be 5-30+m thick and crosscut 120-250+m of compacted stratigraphic section. They terminate at an unconformity at the top of the Frigg interval where they may have extruded onto the palaeo-seafloor. Class 2 comprises conical sandstone intrusions that emanate some 50-300+m upward from distinct apexes located 400-700+m above the nearest depositional sand body. The conical intrusions may have been sourced from underlying sand bodies by clastic blow out pipes. Both types of intrusions seem to adopt their particular geometry independently of (but occasionally exploiting) polygonal faults within the encasing mudstones. Sandstone intrusions may be highly porous and permeable and are thus important both as reservoirs and as plumbing within thick mudstone sequences.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Memoirs

3D Seismic Technology: Application to the Exploration of Sedimentary Basins

Richard J. Davies
Richard J. Davies
Cardiff University, UK
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Joseph A. Cartwright
Joseph A. Cartwright
Cardiff University, UK
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Simon A. Stewart
Simon A. Stewart
BP, Azerbaijan
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Mark Lappin
Mark Lappin
ExxonMobil Exploration Company, USA
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John R. Underhill
John R. Underhill
The University of Edinburgh, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
29
ISBN electronic:
9781862394049
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

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