Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

The evolution and growth of Central Graben salt structures, Salt Dome Province, Danish North Sea

By
Malene Rank-Friend
Malene Rank-Friend
department of Geology, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 OEX, UKPresent address: WesternGeco, Schlumberger, Schlumberger House, Buckingham Gate, Gatwick Airport, West Sussex RH6 ONZ, UK (e-mail: MFriend2@gatwick.westerngeco.slb.com)
Search for other works by this author on:
Christopher F. Elders
Christopher F. Elders
department of Geology, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 OEX, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

The remarkable spatial resolution of 3D seismic data is particularly important in the study of salt structures, where changes in the distribution of accommodation space resulting from salt withdrawal can be mapped and related to the evolution of the individual salt structures. The Salt Dome Province of the Danish Central Graben provides an interesting example of this approach. Three adjacent salt structures (Skjold, Dan and Kraka) exhibit very different geometries, and their evolution has been the subject of some debate. The present study suggests that the Dan structure is composed almost entirely of Zechstein salt, which, facilitated by de-coupled extension during the Mid-Late Jurassic, has been intruded into and along weak planes of Triassic salt, resulting in an overall domal, circular outline. Skjold is located to the NW of Dan. It consists of Zechstein salt and forms a mature salt stock, which terminates within Upper Cretaceous strata. Skjold evolved from a linear NW-SE trending salt wall and became a point source structure during the Early Cretaceous, in common with the many other Central Graben diapers and coincident with the commencement of thermal subsidence. By contrast, Kraka, a NW-SE trending pillow structure located to the south of the Dan-Skjold alignment never became diapiric. Gravitational downbuilding of the mature Skjold diapir during rapid Cenozoic deposition was punctuated by rejuvenated (active) growth induced by regional compression, most significantly during the Mid-Miocene. This event affected also the Dan and Kraka structures, which otherwise experienced very limited growth during the Cenozoic.

You do not currently have access to this article.
Don't already have an account? Register

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Memoirs

3D Seismic Technology: Application to the Exploration of Sedimentary Basins

Richard J. Davies
Richard J. Davies
Cardiff University, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Joseph A. Cartwright
Joseph A. Cartwright
Cardiff University, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Simon A. Stewart
Simon A. Stewart
BP, Azerbaijan
Search for other works by this author on:
Mark Lappin
Mark Lappin
ExxonMobil Exploration Company, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
John R. Underhill
John R. Underhill
The University of Edinburgh, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of London
Volume
29
ISBN electronic:
9781862394049
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

GeoRef

References

Related

A comprehensive resource of eBooks for researchers in the Earth Sciences

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal