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Book Chapter

Variscan and Pre-Variscan Tectonics

By
Benito Ábalos
Benito Ábalos
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Jordi Carreras
Jordi Carreras
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Elena Druguet
Elena Druguet
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Javier Escuder Viruete
Javier Escuder Viruete
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María Teresa Gómez Pugnaire
María Teresa Gómez Pugnaire
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Saturnino Lorenzo Alvarez
Saturnino Lorenzo Alvarez
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Cecilio Quesada
Cecilio Quesada
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Luis Roberto Rodríguez Fernández
Luis Roberto Rodríguez Fernández
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José Ignacio Gil-Ibarguchi
José Ignacio Gil-Ibarguchi
(co-ordinators)
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Published:
January 01, 2002

Abstract

Outcrops of pre-Mesozoic rocks in Spain form various massifs that relate to both Variscan (Late Palaeozoic) and pre-Variscan tectonic settings (Fig. 9.1). The largest one of these is the so-called Iberian Massif, an autochthonous massif across which an almost complete, undisturbed geotraverse of the European Variscan orogen has been preserved. Other massifs occur as variably reworked basement complexes in Alpine chains. These are: (i) the various pre-Mesozoic massifs of the Iberian and Catalonian Coastal ranges, that can basically be considered autochthonous with respect to the Iberian Massif; (ii) the basement massifs of the axial zone of the Pyrenees; and (iii) parts of the internal zones of the Betics. The latter two are essentially exotic with respect to the Iberian Massif. Several tectonic syntheses have been published so far on this orogen (e.g. Matte 1986, 1991; Julivert & Martínez 1987;, Dallmeyer & Martínez-García 1990;, Martínez-Catalán 1990a;, Ribeiro et al. 1990c;, Quesada 1990b, 1992;, Quesada et al. 1991;, Shelley & Bossière 2000).

It is agreed that the European Variscan belt resulted from the oblique collision and interaction between Palaeozoic supercontinents (Gondwana, Laurentia and Baltica) and a number of continental microplates during Neoproterozoic through Palaeozoic times. These microcontinents included fragments of magmatic arcs formed previously during a process of continental convergence at the margins of the major Neoproterozoic continental masses. Such a process resulted in the so-called Cadomian, Avalonian or Pan-African orogeny, developed

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Geology of Series

The Geology of Spain

Wes Gibbons
Wes Gibbons
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Teresa Moreno
Teresa Moreno
Jaume Almera Institute, CSIC, Barcelona
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Geological Society of London
ISBN electronic:
9781862393912
Publication date:
January 01, 2002

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