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Book Chapter

Palaeozoic Magmatism

By
Antonio Castro
Antonio Castro
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L. Guillermo Corretgé
L. Guillermo Corretgé
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Jesús De La Rosa
Jesús De La Rosa
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Pere Enrique
Pere Enrique
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Francisco J. Martínez
Francisco J. Martínez
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Emilio Pascual
Emilio Pascual
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Marceliano Lago
Marceliano Lago
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Enrique Arranz
Enrique Arranz
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Carlos Galé
Carlos Galé
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Carlos Fernández
Carlos Fernández
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Teodosio Donaire
Teodosio Donaire
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Susana López
Susana López
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Published:
January 01, 2002

Abstract

Most Palaeozoic magmatic rocks in Spain were produced during the Variscan orogeny, and there are excellent and abundant examples of both volcanic and plutonic lithologies. Volcanic units include those in the world-famous Iberian Pyrite Belt, and plutonic rocks exposed in the Iberian Massif include some of the largest and best granite outcrops in the European Variscides. Magmatic rocks are present in all the Iberian tectonostratigraphic zones into which the Variscan orogen in Spain has been classically divided. In addition to these Variscan igneous rocks, there is also evidence for earlier magmatism, including widespread exposures of Neo-proterozoic–Cambrian (Cadomian) age, and the diatreme-like breccias linked to the origin of the remarkable mercury mineralization at Almaden.

In this chapter we deal initially with Palaeozoic volcanic rocks, with special emphasis on the volcanism related to the generation of the Iberian Pyrite Belt. With regard to the Variscan granitoid rocks we have grouped these according to compositional features and relative age, rather than by tectonostratigraphic zones (the latter approach does not contribute to a better understanding of the magmatism because the emphasis is on differences and not on similarities). However, Variscan granites of the Iberian Massif are described separately from other granitic massifs in the Pyrenees and Catalonian Coastal ranges, because of their geographic separation and the lack of obvious direct links between them.

Outcrops of distinctive mafic and ultramafic rocks, mostly related to granitoids of the appinite–granodiorite association (cf. Pitcher 1997), are treated separately, not least because of their importance in international

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Geology of Series

The Geology of Spain

Wes Gibbons
Wes Gibbons
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Teresa Moreno
Teresa Moreno
Jaume Almera Institute, CSIC, Barcelona
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Geological Society of London
ISBN electronic:
9781862393912
Publication date:
January 01, 2002

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