Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Diagenesis: Dissolution

Published:
January 01, 2015

Abstract

This chapter deals with the removal of minerals from sandstones and mudrocks during any stage of diagenesis by pore waters undersaturated with respect to one or more minerals. Dissolution has long been known to be important in “more soluble” rocks, especially carbonates and evaporites, but the past five decades have seen a growing understanding that it is an important process in clastic terrigenous deposits as well. It should not have been a surprise—sandstones and mudrocks can comprise many different minerals, detrital as well as authigenic, that were formed under a wide range of conditions. Subsequent eogenetic, mesogenetic and telogenetic diagenetic environments subject minerals to varied temperatures and pressures and especially to diverse water chemistries that potentially can range from nearly pure meteoric water to hypersaline brines and from acidic to alkaline. As a result, one can find instances of dissolution of almost any mineral. Widespread dissolution of common grains and cements may have a significant impact on the ultimate composition of terrigenous rocks, their porosity and their reservoir potential.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

AAPG Memoir

A Color Guide to the Petrography of Sandstones, Siltstones, Shales and Associated Rocks

Dana S. Ulmer-Scholle
Dana S. Ulmer-Scholle
Search for other works by this author on:
Peter A. Scholle
Peter A. Scholle
Search for other works by this author on:
Juergen Schieber
Juergen Schieber
Search for other works by this author on:
Robert J. Raine
Robert J. Raine
Search for other works by this author on:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
109
ISBN electronic:
9781629812731
Publication date:
January 01, 2015

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal