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Book Chapter

Carbonate Cements and Authigenic Precipitates

Published:
January 01, 2015

Abstract

Carbonate minerals, particularly calcite, dolomite, ankerite and siderite, are important as cements and replacements in sandstones and mudstones. Perhaps surprisingly, carbonate cements can be difficult to work with in terms of quantifying conditions of formation (including time, temperature and water chemistry). There are two reasons for this. First, some carbonate minerals (especially dolomite in the context of cements in clastic terrigenous deposits) can recrystallize at one or more stages, resetting their diagnostic fabrics and elemental and isotopic composition. Second, all carbonate cements are relatively soft minerals with multiple cleavages. That means that fluid inclusions, when subjected to temperatures higher than those at which they formed, can stretch or leak, resetting apparent temperatures of formation (Goldstein, 1986 and 2001). That said, there is abundant evidence that carbonate cements form at virtually any stage of diagenesis, from synsedimentary to deep burial (see overview in Morad, 1998).

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AAPG Memoir

A Color Guide to the Petrography of Sandstones, Siltstones, Shales and Associated Rocks

Dana S. Ulmer-Scholle
Dana S. Ulmer-Scholle
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Peter A. Scholle
Peter A. Scholle
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Juergen Schieber
Juergen Schieber
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Robert J. Raine
Robert J. Raine
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
109
ISBN electronic:
9781629812731
Publication date:
January 01, 2015

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