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Sandstone Classification

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Published:
January 01, 2015

Abstract

More than 50 different classification schemes for sandstones have been proposed over the past century. Some of those classifications are mainly related to the textural properties of clastic terrigenous deposits (and those are discussed in Chapter 6). Many of the sandstone classifications combine texture and composition, sometimes confusing the important distinction between those two characteristics. Others focus exclusively on composition, although some provide separate terms to describe textures. However, the many classifications typically share a few common characteristics. Most plot compositional data on ternary diagrams, with quartz, feldspar and lithic fragments as the poles—referred to as QFL diagrams. As always, however, the devil is in the details. For example, what qualifies as quartz (monocrystalline quartz, polycrystalline quartz, chert or other quartzose rock fragments) varies from classification to classification, as do the rock names and the percentage boundaries applied in different nomenclatural schemes.

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Contents

AAPG Memoir

A Color Guide to the Petrography of Sandstones, Siltstones, Shales and Associated Rocks

Dana S. Ulmer-Scholle
Dana S. Ulmer-Scholle
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Peter A. Scholle
Peter A. Scholle
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Juergen Schieber
Juergen Schieber
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Robert J. Raine
Robert J. Raine
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
109
ISBN electronic:
9781629812731
Publication date:
January 01, 2015

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