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Book Chapter

Modeling of a Tide-influenced Point-bar Heterogeneity Distribution and Impacts on Steam-assisted Gravity Drainage Production: Example from Steepbank River, McMurray Formation, Canada

By
Geoffray Musial
Geoffray Musial
BEICIP-FRANLAB 232 Ave. Napoléon Bonaparte, 92500 Rueil-Malmaison, France (e-mail: geoffray.musial@beicip.com)
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Richard Labourdette
Richard Labourdette
Total, Geosciences Technologies, Ave. Larribau 64018 Pau Cedex, France (e-mails: richard.labourdette@total.com; jessica.franco@total.com)
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Jessica Franco
Jessica Franco
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Jean-Yves Reynaud
Jean-Yves Reynaud
Université de Lille 1, UFR de Sciences de la Terre, Cité Scientifique-Bat. SN5, F-59655 Villeneuva d’Asca Cedex, France (e-mail: jean-yves.reynaud@univ-lille1.fr)
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Published:
January 01, 2013

Abstract

Outcrops and subsurface investigations emphasize that the main bitumen reservoirs of the McMurray Formation are large point-bar deposits. Sedimentological studies performed on these reservoir objects have shown that tidal currents occurred in the meandering paleo-river system. These tidal inputs increased reservoir heterogeneities primarily because of successive mud decantation periods and the many reactivation or erosion surfaces. Five main reservoir heterogeneities have been described on Steepbank River outcrops: mud accumulation during channel abandonment, mud drapes along accretion surfaces that are downward interfingered into cleaner sands, flood-plain deposits on top of the point bar, reactivation surfaces typically associated with mud-clast deposits, and mud-clast breccias accumulated at the base of the channel. At the same time, five main facies have been emphasized on these studied tide-influenced point bars: mud-clast breccias, cross-stratified sands, slightly heterolithic rippled sands, highly heterolithic burrowed sands, and thick mudstones. For each of these facies, petrophysical properties have been established, enabling their application as rock types for the Steepbank River outcrop modeling. This deterministic method of modeling, improved by light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data, used truncated Gaussian simulations constrained by the proportion cube, sedimentological logs corresponding to hard data, and adequate variograms. The resulting facies and heterogeneity distributions conform closely to the outcrop reality, lending support for the modeling method.

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Contents

AAPG Studies in Geology

Heavy-oil and Oil-sand Petroleum Systems in Alberta and Beyond

Frances J. Hein
Frances J. Hein
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Dale Leckie
Dale Leckie
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Steve Larter
Steve Larter
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John R. Suter
John R. Suter
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
64
ISBN electronic:
9781629812649
Publication date:
January 01, 2013

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