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Relation of Oil and Gas Accumulation to Geologic Structure in the Mid-Continent Region

By
C. W. Tomlinson
C. W. Tomlinson
Ardmore, Oklahoma
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Published:
January 01, 1934

Abstract

The Mid-Continent oil and gas region, in the broadest use of the term, includes all of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Arkansas, and all of Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi excepting a strip less than 100 miles wide along the coast of those three states, and also eastern New Mexico and western Missouri—an area 900 miles in diameter, comprising about one-sixth of the total area of the United States. The productive strata in this vast region range in age from early Ordovician to Tertiary, and are scattered through formations exceeding 50,000 feet in aggregate maximum thickness. Productive beds younger than Paleozoic are confined to the Gulf Coastal Plain.

Present producing depths range from less than 100 feet to almost 9,000 feet, with no indication that production may not be found at much greater depths where the mantle of sediments is very thick.

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Contents

AAPG Special Publication

Problems of Petroleum Geology

W. E. Wrather
W. E. Wrather
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F. H. Lahee
F. H. Lahee
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
ISBN electronic:
9781629812564
Publication date:
January 01, 1934

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