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Book Chapter

A Study of the Evidences for Lateral and Vertical Migration of Oil

By
Frederic H. Lahee
Frederic H. Lahee
Dallas, Texas
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Published:
January 01, 1934

Abstract

“Lateral migration” is defined as movement of oil (or other fluids), essentially parallel with the bedding, and “vertical migration” as movement of oil essentially across the bedding, in a series of strata. These two methods of migration are discussed as they are related (1) to lenses, structural terraces, and anticlinal noses; (2) to domes and closed anticlines; and (3) to fault structures. Strong arguments are presented for both phenomena, but the preponderance of evidence is in favor of lateral migration; for even if vertical migration be granted in certain cases, the oil must almost certainly have reached the channel of “vertical movement” by a process of lateral migration through porous media at unknown depths. Vertical migration has undoubtedly assisted or even effected the accumulation of oil in some reservoirs (and perhaps the depletion of oil in others), but all pools have been served, directly or indirectly, by lateral migration.

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AAPG Special Publication

Problems of Petroleum Geology

W. E. Wrather
W. E. Wrather
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F. H. Lahee
F. H. Lahee
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
ISBN electronic:
9781629812564
Publication date:
January 01, 1934

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