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Book Chapter

Survey of Diapirs and Diapirism1

By
G. D. O’Brien
G. D. O’Brien
Midland, Texas 79701
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Published:
January 01, 1968

Abstract

“Diapir” and “diapirism” come from the Greek diapeirein, which means “to pierce.” Diapirism sensu lato is a process by which earth materials from deeper levels have pierced, or appear to have pierced, shallower materials; it is divided into magmatic intrusion and diapirism sensu stricto on the basis of the temperature at which piercement occurs. Diapirs s.s. are composed of evaporites, argillaceous sediments, coal, peat, ice, serpentine, or other earth materials which have the critical characteristics of low equivalent viscosity and low density. These materials range in age from Precambrian to Recent. Diapirs are found in all parts of the world except the shield areas. They have many forms, ranging from smoothly rounded pillows to complexly injected laminae, are either connected with or disconnected from the “mother” bed, and are present either at the surface, where they form distinctive features, or at considerable depth. Diapirs have well-developed internal structures indicative of an origin by flow. Strata around a diapir may be strongly affected structurally and/or stratigraphically by the diapir, or they may be unaffected. Field and model studies indicate that diapirs have developed as a result of horizontal compression, gravitational instability, or both. Diapiric structures of various types contain large quantities of oil and gas, sulfur, salt, and potash and are important for underground storage and nuclear testing.

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Contents

AAPG Memoir

Diapirism and Diapirs: a symposium

Jules Braunstein
Jules Braunstein
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Gerald D. O’Brien
Gerald D. O’Brien
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
8
ISBN electronic:
9781629812304
Publication date:
January 01, 1968

GeoRef

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