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Book Chapter

Geology of the Hibernia Discovery

By
K. R. Arthur
K. R. Arthur
Chevron Standard Limited Calgary, Alberta
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D. R. Cole
D. R. Cole
Chevron Standard Limited Calgary, Alberta
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G. G. L. Henderson
G. G. L. Henderson
Chevron Standard Limited Calgary, Alberta
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D. W. Kushnir
D. W. Kushnir
Chevron Standard Limited Calgary, Alberta
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Published:
January 01, 1982

Abstract

The Hibernia oil field was discovered by Chevron Standard Ltd. and partners in 1979. The discovery well, Chevron et al Hibernia P-15, was drilled on the Grand Banks 325 km east of St. John's Newfoundland in 80 m of water. Delineation drilling, completed during 1980 and the early part of 1981, has confirmed the pressure of a giant oil field which, in all probability, will contain recoverable reserves in excess of 1 billion bbls of oil. The discovery and first delineation wells each have an indicated productivity in excess of 20,000 b/d.

The oil field is located near the northwestern edge of the Jeanne d'Arc subbasin, a southwestern extension of the much larger East Newfoundland Basin. The Hibernia structure is a large north-northeast trending rollover anticline, bounded on the west by a major listric growth fault, and dissected into a number of separate blocks by transverse faults. The potentially most productive reservoirs are sandstones of Lower Cretaceous age which appear to be deltaic in origin.

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Contents

AAPG Memoir

The Deliberate Search for the Subtle Trap

Michel T. Halbouty
Michel T. Halbouty
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
32
ISBN electronic:
9781629811697
Publication date:
January 01, 1982

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