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Book Chapter

Tertiary Gulf Coast Diapirism

Published:
January 01, 1984

Abstract

Figures 1 and 2 show the distribution of salt structures in the Louann Salt underlying approximately half of the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast. Thinner salt is present outside these areas. The southern bulge of salt into the abyssal Gulf is due to southward creep of allochthonous salt forming the Sigsbee Scarp.

The vertically exaggerated N-S cross section in figure 3 extends from the marginal East Texas Basin across the central Gulf. The depocenter is beneath the continental margin.

The size, shape, and concentration of salt structures show a general trend from the continental slope to the abyssal plain: salt structures become older, more circular, and smaller in plan, and structurally more mature (fig. 4). They become smaller in plan because they are elongating upward in the third dimension. They become more circular because salt ridges segment into elliptical pillows which grow into subcircular diapirs by amplification of their crestal zones.

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Contents

AAPG Continuing Education Course Notes Series

Structural and Depositional Styles of Gulf Coast Tertiary Continental Margins: Application to Hydrocarbon Exploration

Martin P.A. Jackson
Martin P.A. Jackson
Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin
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William E. Galloway
William E. Galloway
Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin
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American Association of Petroleum Geologists
Volume
25
ISBN electronic:
9781629811543
Publication date:
January 01, 1984

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