Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

A perspective on 3D surface-related multiple elimination

By
Bill Dragoset
Bill Dragoset
1WesternGeco, Geo Solutions Technology, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. E-mail: wdragoset@slb.com.
Search for other works by this author on:
Eric Verschuur
Eric Verschuur
2Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands. E-mail: d.j.verschuur@tudelft.nl.
Search for other works by this author on:
Ian Moore
Ian Moore
3WesternGeco, GeoSolutions Technology, Perth, Australia. E-mail: imoore1@slb.com; rbisley@slb.com.
Search for other works by this author on:
Richard Bisley
Richard Bisley
3WesternGeco, GeoSolutions Technology, Perth, Australia. E-mail: imoore1@slb.com; rbisley@slb.com.
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2010

Abstract

Surface-related multiple elimination (SRME) is an algorithm that predicts all surface multiples by a convolutional process applied to seismic field data. Only minimal preprocessing is required. Once predicted, the multiples are removed from the data by adaptive subtraction. Unlike other methods of multiple attenuation, SRME does not rely on assumptions or knowledge about the subsurface, nor does it use event properties to discriminate between multiples and primaries. In exchange for this “freedom from the subsurface,” SRME requires knowledge of the acquisition wavelet and a dense spatial distribution of sources and receivers. Although a 2D version of SRME sometimes suffices, most field data sets require 3D SRME for accurate multiple prediction. All implementations of 3D SRME face a serious challenge: The sparse spatial distribution of sources and receivers available in typical seismic field data sets does not conform to the algorithmic requirements. There are several approaches to implementing 3D SRME that address the data sparseness problem. Among those approaches are pre-SRME data interpolation, on-the-fly data interpolation, zero-azimuth SRME, and true-azimuth SRME. Field data examples confirm that (1) multiples predicted using true-azimuth 3D SRME are more accurate than those using zero-azimuth 3D SRME and (2) on-the-fly interpolation produces excellent results.

You do not currently have access to this article.
Don't already have an account? Register

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geophysical References Series

Geophysics Today: A Survey of the Field as the Journal Celebrates its 75th Anniversary

Sergey Fomel
Sergey Fomel
Search for other works by this author on:
Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Volume
16
ISBN electronic:
9781560802273
Publication date:
January 01, 2010

GeoRef

References

Related

A comprehensive resource of eBooks for researchers in the Earth Sciences

This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

View Article Abstract & Purchase Options

For full access to this pdf, sign in to an existing account, or purchase an annual subscription.

Subscribe Now