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The giant Escondida district in northern Chile, discovered in 1981, includes the major porphyry copper deposits at Escondida-Escondida Este, Escondida Norte-Zaldívar, Pampa Escondida, and two small deposits (the Escondida cluster), besides the Chimborazo deposit. The district contains at least 144 million metric tons (Mt) of copper. The Escondida district is part of the middle Eocene to early Oligocene porphyry copper belt, which follows the trench-parallel Domeyko fault system, a product of the Incaic transpressional tectonic phase. At the district scale, the major N-striking Portezuelo-Panadero oblique-reverse fault juxtaposes latest Carboniferous to Early Permian igneous basement with an andesitic volcanic sequence...

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